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  • #16
    Originally posted by TexasFireWater1977 View Post
    Thanks for all the info!! Big help... We are looking at other trucks also. We just looked at a Rosenbauer Cenurion "very nice"...
    Maybe try a Sutphen... you can choose either a stainless body, or an aluminum body. It is a nice truck and cab/chassis/pump module/rear body are all Sutphen made. Here is a picture of a Shield pumper that we got back in January. Great truck, and it was much cheaper than the competition.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by 93Cobra View Post
      Maybe try a Sutphen... you can choose either a stainless body, or an aluminum body. It is a nice truck and cab/chassis/pump module/rear body are all Sutphen made. Here is a picture of a Shield pumper that we got back in January. Great truck, and it was much cheaper than the competition.
      How did I know you were going to post about a Sutphen?

      To the OP, if this was going to be a first out pumper then IMHO I would go with a standard midship pump. The PUC doesn't seem too bad for a rig more set up to be a rescue pumper. It's all about how you intend to use the rig.
      I can't believe they actually pay me to do this!!!

      One friend noted yesterday that a fire officer only carries a flashlight, sometimes prompting grumbling from firefighters who have to lug tools and hoses.
      "The old saying is you never know how heavy that flashlight can become," the friend said.
      -from a tragic story posted on firefighterclosecalls.com

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      • #18
        Originally posted by FyredUp View Post
        There should be no problems at all with a properly installed Darley pump. They are a world wide supplier of fire pumps and have won several contracts supplying portable fire pumps to the military. Add to that the fact that Darley has been in business for over a hundred years.

        No, I am not affiliated with WS Darley in any manner. Nor am I a sales agent for anyone marketing Darley pumps or any other Darley product.
        Let's just say our experiences differ. Hale pumps here for reliability reasons. T.C.

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        • #19
          http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...=111522&page=2 also see here
          IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
          Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
          ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
          RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
          LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
          I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
          "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
          http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Rescue101 View Post
            Let's just say our experiences differ. Hale pumps here for reliability reasons. T.C.
            My volly FD has used Hale, Waterous, Darley and Barton American. The only pump we have ever had fail was a Hale...

            I guess we didn't learn because our three front line rigs all are Hale pumps!
            Crazy, but that's how it goes
            Millions of people living as foes
            Maybe it's not too late
            To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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            • #21
              Originally posted by 93Cobra View Post
              Maybe try a Sutphen... you can choose either a stainless body, or an aluminum body. It is a nice truck and cab/chassis/pump module/rear body are all Sutphen made. Here is a picture of a Shield pumper that we got back in January. Great truck, and it was much cheaper than the competition.
              That suckphen grill and headlight configuration is the ugliest thing going in the fire apparatus business.

              Comment


              • #22
                I actually think the Sutphens are some of the best looking trucks out there. Now, if you want to see ugly, let me help you out.




                And my personal most ugly fire apparatus...
                Career Firefighter
                Volunteer Captain

                -Professional in Either Role-

                Originally posted by Rescue101
                I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by TexasFireWater1977 View Post
                  Hello all,

                  My department is looking at getting a new pumper (Pierce Puc)... Could you please help me out with pro's and con's of this pumper... Also my department has 100% Hale pumps and the Pierce has a Darley...

                  Thanks for any and all help....

                  Worked on a few lately. The choice of a PUC (or other manufacturer similar styles) is compltetly dependant upon your intended use in YOUR department. Personally, as a first due FIRE engine, I don't like them. The hosebeds are usually very high, and the crosslays are awful. They are loaded in trays which must be removed to pack, and a have been very tight. There is also limited room between the body and cab to pull them if you are a "big" guy (Or gal!).

                  That being said, if you are looking for a heavy-rescue with some engine company capabilities, it may suit you fine. The ones i have seen have placed heavy emphasis on compartment capacity rather than real-world fire engine ops.

                  As always, it comes down to how YOU spec them.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by FD1976 View Post
                    Worked on a few lately. The choice of a PUC (or other manufacturer similar styles) is compltetly dependant upon your intended use in YOUR department. Personally, as a first due FIRE engine, I don't like them. The hosebeds are usually very high, and the crosslays are awful. They are loaded in trays which must be removed to pack, and a have been very tight. There is also limited room between the body and cab to pull them if you are a "big" guy (Or gal!).

                    That being said, if you are looking for a heavy-rescue with some engine company capabilities, it may suit you fine. The ones i have seen have placed heavy emphasis on compartment capacity rather than real-world fire engine ops.

                    As always, it comes down to how YOU spec them.
                    That's one aspect I do like - the trays for loading hose. Properly sized, they're fantastic and we have a couple extra at the firehouse preloaded so we can just slide dry hose in and leave the wet stuff to be hung when it isn't 3 am. We have two engines where the trays are great, nicely designed, well sized. The newest one, the engineer should be flogged with wet 1-3/4 for thinking that 200 feet would actually fit...
                    "Share your knowledge - it's a way to achieve immortality." - Stolen from Chase Sargent's Buddy to Boss program

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                    • #25
                      We just ordered ours in August and should be able to pick it up around the end of January. Talking about the crosslays. We removed the standard crosslays from the center of the truck and put speedlays into our 24" front bumper. Have room for (2) 200' lays of 1 3/4" lines. Our neighbors did this on their rear mount and love it. Easy reloading and access. This will be repalcing our used ambulance that we use as a rescue. Also our current engine is 21 years old. This will be our first out truck to all calls. Mostly rescue and ems so we felt this gave us enough storage to combine our rescue and engine all in one and still have a little room for "toys". It will have 1000 gallons of water, 10kw hydraulic gen, light tower, coffin cabinets and of course my favorite will be the Q! We also added a camera on the driver side quartz light with the screen on the pump panel. Our current engine is a top mount and to ease everyone that if the truck doesn't get positioned right in a farm yard or street, they will still be able to see what is going on. Man I could ramble on and on about this truck. Never been a "P" flavored kool aid drinker but after seeing first hand the fit and finish compared to the rest I'm glad we went that direction. Can't wait until we can back her into the station!!!

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by SMNFirefighter View Post
                        Can't wait until we can back her into the station!!!
                        With all due respect, it's a rig, a piece, an engine, a truck, a pumper ,a tanker, a ladder etc. It always creeps me out when a fire truck is refered to as "Her".
                        Some of you guys take this way too personel. Why don't you paint some nose art on "her"!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I suppose the first question regarding a switch from the traditional midship configuration is: "What is my objective for doing so?" Is it more compartment space, shorter wheelbase, ect"

                          Just because something is new is no reason to switch. Waiting a little can tell you if its a fad or a trend. I been around long enough to see both; Urban interface vehicles used to be called quick response vehicles, and mini- or midi- pumpers before that. Each fire service generation has to learn the lessons for themselves. Manufacturers were pushing rear mount pumps about 15-20 years ago but they never caught on. Now they're back in vogue.And remember the E-One Hush? The design was supposed to revolutionize fire trucks

                          Regarding your question about the pump, Darley builds as good a pump as the other 2 players (if not better). One question to ask (and you probably already know the answer), is do you have to purchase pump parts exclusively from Pierce?) Knowing Pierce as I do, it would be shocking if they allowed you to purchase direct from Darley.

                          The pump mechanics need to weigh in on how easy the pump, plumbing, and drivetrain are to access.
                          How much extra cost is the PUC design over a traditional design and would you rather spend the dollars elsewhere? Unless you're department is rolling in money, sometimes you have to give up this to get that.

                          Good luck in you search.

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                          • #28
                            As others have stated, your focus should be on what it's intended use is, serviceability, parts (as mentioned above), and... how much compartment space are you actually gaining? I haven't looked closely at the PUC, but if I were considering purchasing one, I would certainly do the math as far as storage space is concerned.
                            TruckCommittee.com

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                            • #29
                              The ironic part of the compartment space issue is that many of them are only half-filled, or have useless stuff you will never use. Because of that, the hosebeds suffer.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by FD1976 View Post
                                The ironic part of the compartment space issue is that many of them are only half-filled, or have useless stuff you will never use. Because of that, the hosebeds suffer.
                                What in particular are you considering useless equipment wise that most fire engines carry?
                                Career Firefighter
                                Volunteer Captain

                                -Professional in Either Role-

                                Originally posted by Rescue101
                                I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

                                Comment

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