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  • GTRider245
    replied
    Hey Fyred,

    It seems that worrying about mounting tools in a more accessible location should be a moot point when it appears you have a step ladder strapped to your roof ladder. Never know when you may have to throw it in a hurry...

    And I couldnt tell from the pics, but does that truck have traditional crosslays in addition to the bumper lines? Only reason I ask is becuase in my (limited) expirience with rubber hose, it sucks interior.

    I am a huge fan of the Ahrens-Fox body. I share as much distaste for a HME cab. We have one HME/A-F truck in our fleet and the cab is cheaply built while the body is top notch. Just preference I guess. Oh and PowerArc warning lights...I wont even go there. I would rather just turn on the 4 way flashers.

    Good looking truck though.

    Leave a comment:


  • firepundit
    replied
    Originally posted by gwp026 View Post
    Thank you all so far. Perhaps I need to elaborate. The primary function here is engine company duties. We already have a light rescue/mini pumper that is primary for vehicle rescues & related incidents. This pumper will respond secondary to rescues, mvc's, etc. Currently we are carrying 1500' 5" LDH, about 400' 3" & 400' 1 3/4" (in the bed). This works for our needs. I am a little familiar with the "L" or "T" tank idea & feel that is probably the only way to accomplish our requirements.
    The hose you have specified will require approx. 81 cubic feet of space with an approx. weight of 2171 pounds. 1000 gallons of water will require approx. 133.6 cubic feet and weigh about 8345 pounds, not including tank.

    Frame rails on class 8 chassis generally run about 38" high. Add 2" for a tank cradle and you will be starting about 40" from the ground before you have added anything.

    Since you want full depth (24") compartments the area you can use for storage of water and hose will be 48" wide on a 96" wide body (max. legal width on most roads.) The water tank will only be about 46" wide for clearance.

    With a 10' body (doesn't include pump compt.) and 1" clearance your water tank will be 118" long x 46" wide,will contain about 23.5 gallons per inch of height and would end up being 42.5" tall (Actually more since I have not allowed for material thickness or baffles). Already, the top of the tank is 82.5" from the ground and you don't even have hosebed decking. Since the hose can be stored in the full width between the side compartments the hose load will be about 3.33 cubic feet per inch of height thus, about 24" in height. for an estimated total of 106.5".

    That is the basic process for the calculations. You can probably handle the rest but here are the estimated gallon and cubic feet per inch height figures:

    12' long body Water 28.28 gal/in. Hose 4.0 cu.ft./in.
    14' long body Water 33.06 gal/in. Hose 4.67 cu.ft./in.

    Bear in mind that these are simple estimates. Many things can change these numbers. Examples that could raise the height are: Ladders stored in tank pass through, discharge w/tank pass through, rear suction, special depth rear compartment.

    Leave a comment:


  • donethat
    replied
    Originally posted by FyredUp View Post
    More of E-142.
    Definately 15 lbs in a 5 lb sack.

    Leave a comment:


  • Squad50FF
    replied
    Originally posted by ChiefKN View Post
    Not sure if you are referring to the link I posted... but.

    It's a lower hosebed then 56, but those aren't full depth compartments.
    ChiefKN,

    I was referring to a Co. near gwp026. Thanks for the info anyways. Sorry for the confusion

    Leave a comment:


  • Chenzo
    replied
    Originally posted by FyredUp View Post
    More of E-141
    Ermmm.... This is no Mack CF............................ Therefore, it CAN'T be more of E-141


    She is a nice looking rig though.

    Leave a comment:


  • FyredUp
    replied
    More of E-142.

    Happy now Chenzo ya freaking nit picker!
    Last edited by FyredUp; 09-19-2010, 11:43 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • FyredUp
    replied
    Well.....since he has no e-mail here we go with more pics.

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  • FyredUp
    replied
    gwp026,

    Here are a couple of pictures of our 2005 HME Ahrens Fox Rescue Engine, I will e-mail you the rest. It has a 2000 gpm pump, 1020 gallons of water, 20 gallon Class A foam tank with a Hale Foam Logix system, 10kW generator and 4-1500 watt extendable lights and a 1500 watt eyebrow light. All the lighting is LED, except the headlights, and the siren is an e-Q2B. There are 5 SCBA seats, an interior EMS/junk cabinet, and what fire truck is complete without A/C and an AM/FM/WEATHER BAND/CD 4 speaker radio!!

    What I would do different with 20/20 hindsight.

    1) For using the hydraulic extrication hose reels I would have had either an electric or pto pump installed. Electric would probably be far cheaper and easier to plumb. Why? Ease of operation, speed of getting a tool into operation, less maintenance for the frontline tool.

    2) I would place the reel above the side compartments in a small coffin style compartment to get them out of the compartment to open up that space for tool storage. If the pump was electric I would mount that up there too.

    3) I would look at mounting more tools where they are more accessible instead of in compartments. While being in a compartment keeps the tools cleaner it makes them slower to get to and slows down firefighters going to work. I believe axes and the Irons should be mounted near the riding positions and with the new straps and brackets this can be done safely.

    4) Remote control deck gun. Yes they can be pricey, but I bet far less than the cost of a firefighter falling off the top of the truck.

    5) I would not waste an entire compartment on SCBA spare bottles. There are far more creative ways to do that.

    All in all it is a good rig with plenty of storage space.
    Last edited by FyredUp; 09-19-2010, 10:03 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChiefKN
    replied
    Originally posted by Squad50FF View Post
    Chief,

    If you look at 59-2, it has a 950 gal tank, with fairly safe and convenient cross lay set up, however I'm not sure how the rear hose bed is configured, but it might be worth a look.
    Not sure if you are referring to the link I posted... but.

    It's a lower hosebed then 56, but those aren't full depth compartments.

    Leave a comment:


  • Squad50FF
    replied
    Chief,

    If you look at 59-2, it has a 950 gal tank, with fairly safe and convenient cross lay set up, however I'm not sure how the rear hose bed is configured, but it might be worth a look.

    Leave a comment:


  • RFDACM02
    replied
    We looked for a similar package in our 2009 Rescue Pumper and found that we couldn't get a 750 gwt with a low hosebed and keep the truck short in length. The real skinny here is that, yes, you can get a fairly low hosebed, without the hose in it. Once you load most L-shaped tanks-hosebeds the top of the hose is too high to reach from the ground. We found that we really wanted to protect our personnel by having a low hosebed, but the real danger was in the deployment phase, not in the re-pack phase where we had no excuse not to take the time to do it safely. Having personnel climb onto the rear bumper in the winter to pull loads creates far more potential than repacking the ose in the station. In the end we went with a higher bed and mounted the nozzles and eds low for deployment from the ground.

    If you have to have both a large tank and a low hosebed/hose height you can always go longer!

    Leave a comment:


  • Weruj1
    replied
    we got an 09 KME only 500 gal tank full heigth and depth both sides...want pics let me know. Our hose bed is NOT low.

    Leave a comment:


  • ffp20
    replied
    (One option to consider would be an L shaped tank. It will get you a lower hosebed, but you will sacrifice some depth. )

    The hose bed floor can be low, but the overall finished hose load will still be high.

    Leave a comment:


  • gwp026
    replied
    Originally posted by FyredUp View Post
    Can't do 2009, but how about 2005 with fulol height full depth compartments? 2000 gpm pump 1000 gallons of water? If interested let me know and I will send you pics.
    Absolutely, I welcome all ideas.

    Leave a comment:


  • gwp026
    replied
    Thank you Chief.

    Leave a comment:

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