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Extrication scene safety

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  • Extrication scene safety

    I first posted this question on the "university of extrication" forum, but as a volunteer I thought I would learn from the experience of other volunteers. Here's the question. At a vehicle extrication scene, what are the three most important safety considerations--aside from traffic control--that the designated safety officer should be concerned about?

  • #2
    It depends on the particular scene. You have MANY factors, type of road, time of day, traffic, weather, utilities, terrain, people that have altered LOC or drugs on board, you name it. There are TOO MANY variable to say "these are the top three hazards". You should look at a lot of different cases, there are many sources like Youtube, Statter911, Firehouse.com, etc. Use a lot of local incidents as learning tools. Danger comes in many forms, and it can be as simple as not shutting off the engine of a car with minor damage, to not chocking the wheels of a car that you didn't know had bad brakes. It doesn't take a wreck involving a truck hauling a nuclear warhead hanging off a cliff in a thunderstorm to create a hazard bad enough to kill or seriously injure a responder.

    Comment


    • #3
      Fuel leakage with ignition possible.
      Vehicle rolling or shifting.
      Preventing injury caused by slippery surface, tool misuse or accident, sharp objects or edges.

      Traffic control is probably the most important task at the scene.

      Comment


      • #4
        Stabilization, fuel leaks and/or fire patient safety. But, it's case by case. Lots to be concern with

        Comment


        • #5
          1) if you lift an inch, crib and inch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zb1X...has_verified=1
          2) have a buffer between yourself and oncoming traffic https://www.kentland33.com/2017/11/0...crew-citizens/
          3) Wear your damn PPE if you are going to be in the hot zone (I wish I could find the picture of the firefighter with an airpack on with no helmet or coat with a hydraulic spreaders in use)
          If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

          FF/EMT/DBP

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by drparasite View Post
            1) if you lift an inch, crib and inch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zb1X...has_verified=1
            2) have a buffer between yourself and oncoming traffic https://www.kentland33.com/2017/11/0...crew-citizens/
            3) Wear your damn PPE if you are going to be in the hot zone (I wish I could find the picture of the firefighter with an airpack on with no helmet or coat with a hydraulic spreaders in use)
            I know the photo that you're referring to, the guy was quite the idiot.

            Comment


            • #7
              I was trying to find it to use in my extrication class.... "don't be this guy" but I couldn't find it anywhere on the web
              If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

              FF/EMT/DBP

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by drparasite View Post
                I was trying to find it to use in my extrication class.... "don't be this guy" but I couldn't find it anywhere on the web
                And they say nothing ever disappears from the web....

                While suggestions about specific tasks are important, as noted, there are so many tasks that it's hard to focus on just a few.

                I'll offer this - and it applies to everything we do, not just extrication.

                We're number one. We need to protect ourselves or we don't do our patients any good at all. That includes PPE and traffic control.

                We're there to protect and rescue the patient(s). Everything we do with regard to the patient(s) needs to include them as a player. If they're able to comprehend (and even if we think they may not) we should be explaining what we are doing to them.

                Try before pry. The fire service is rife with stories about cutting apart vehicles with perfectly functional doors...
                Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

                Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tree68 View Post
                  And they say nothing ever disappears from the web....
                  you know what? they are right. Finally found it



                  If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

                  FF/EMT/DBP

                  Comment

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