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  • KuhShise
    replied
    Rice, you are absolutely correct. Too many times we get prospective drivers on the course who have been driving an ambulance or brush rig, but are asked to jump in a large engine or even an aerial. It becomes quickly apparent that these candidates have no concept of where the corners of the larger apparatus are. Then we are killing "Penn-DOT" workers (Orange cones). The term is appropriate since the highway department is usually the source of cones for the course.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rice09
    replied
    I kind of think they should have departments train new drivers and let them get comfortable with the apparatus before they take the course. I mean at least to some degree. Just my opinion.

    Leave a comment:


  • tree68
    replied
    In the end, just remember - you're doing this now so you'll be that much better in the real world. A cone is a cone. Yeah, you hit it, got a black mark and took some razzing from your classmates. Find out what you did wrong and don't do it again.

    Next time it might not be a cone.

    Leave a comment:


  • KuhShise
    replied
    Take the time to adjust the mirrors properly before you start. Most apparatus mirrors, (as you will learn) are not well suited to backing through cones. The convex ones make the cones so small you will need to stare hard to see which ones you are avoiding. I do not agree with using a spotter, because the course is designed to help the student judge the 4 corners of the apparatus. The latest version has also dropped the time requirements, but I still like to keep a little psychological pressure on the driver by using the clock. There are tricks that can help you with navigating the course. Before you start, put a notebook or other indicator on the ground even with the rear bumper. Sit in the seat and look at the indicator, then have someone place a piece of tape on the fender or rub rail that matches the indicator location. When you back into the dock, just stop before the tape reaches the back line. The key to the serpentine is keep your rear wheels close to the cone. Lets say you drive up the right side (cones on your left) to begin. Stop with your rear wheel even or slightly past the last cone. Cramp the wheel all the way to the left, and begin backing. Watch the right mirror and pick up the next cone when it emerges from behing the vehicle. Steer the right side directly toward the cone (couple inches away with wheels straight) until the right rear is beside that cone, Spin the steering wheel to the right, and watch your left mirror for the next cone to appear. If you made your turn when the rear wheel was opposite the cone, there is no way to hit that cone beacuse your front end is swinging away from it. Parallel park..Crowd the cone to get your rear close to the corner cone. We use a piece of plastic water pipe in this cone so the driver can see it and judge when to cut the front end into the stall. Point your right side about 1 cone up from the back line. Aim the side at that spot until your front clears the corner cone and then spin the wheel to the left to bring the front end into the parking stall. Judging the end line is tough if the end line cones aren't kept right out the the traffic lane. In real life when I am training drivers, backing is about 60% of the driving time. It forces the habit of looking in the mirror, so when going down the road, you can watch for the Pizza Delivery driver who is drafting you to get the next delivery done on time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rice09
    replied
    I've driven some decently sized trucks, but I admit I'm a little vervous. I looked at some videos online, lol. I'm actually fairly confident, I'm a pretty safe driver,so we'll see.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptOldTimer
    replied
    Originally posted by pasobuff View Post
    Even if you don't drive apparatus, it helps you understand what operators deal with when driving - give many a new respect for the apparatus and how hard it can be to steer/brake etc.....
    I probably could get certified to drive one of your horses. I've walked behind mules before. That should count.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rice09
    replied
    I got the link to work


    I'm registered for the Evoc class in April
    Last edited by Rice09; 03-28-2011, 06:09 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • pasobuff
    replied
    do you have adobe reader? I just opened the link no problem.....

    The link goes to the County listing for NYS of training classes currently scheduled through the end of March.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Rice09
    replied
    Originally posted by pasobuff View Post
    I agree with you Tree!.....Chubb sponsors a lot of classes too, but you have to go to their training center in NJ.....

    Nothing through the end of May for Genesee.....do you have this link to check back to?

    http://www.dhses.ny.gov/ofpc/trainin...htrngsched.pdf
    Not sure what you mean. That link wouldn't open.

    Leave a comment:


  • AndrewR
    replied
    Originally posted by Rice09 View Post
    That's kind of what I was thinking, thanks for stating what I couldn't. I was thinking that it would help, even if I don't drive.

    To answer you questions:
    It's a 2 day weekend class. Saturday (8-5) is lecture training and Sunday is driving.
    It's sponsored by Shepard, Maxwell & Hale Insurance
    It's in Genesee County in NY. My County (Wyoming) hasn't had it come up in a while.

    It's titled:
    E.V.O.C. UTICA MUTUAL EMERGENCY VEHICLE OPERATION
    Its a great class, when I took EVOC a year or so ago they were the people who sponsored our class as well. A very good program that will as they have all said open your eyes and show you just what can happen to you personally if you drive like an idiot.

    Leave a comment:


  • pasobuff
    replied
    I agree with you Tree!.....Chubb sponsors a lot of classes too, but you have to go to their training center in NJ.....

    Nothing through the end of May for Genesee.....do you have this link to check back to?

    Leave a comment:


  • tree68
    replied
    Originally posted by Rice09 View Post
    UTICA MUTUAL
    A very fire-minded insurance company (there's a steamer in their lobby). It says something if the insurance companies are willing to provide these classes - free.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rice09
    replied
    Originally posted by pasobuff View Post
    Even if you don't drive apparatus, it helps you understand what operators deal with when driving - give many a new respect for the apparatus and how hard it can be to steer/brake etc.....
    That's kind of what I was thinking, thanks for stating what I couldn't. I was thinking that it would help, even if I don't drive.

    To answer you questions:
    It's a 2 day weekend class. Saturday (8-5) is lecture training and Sunday is driving.
    It's sponsored by Shepard, Maxwell & Hale Insurance
    It's in Genesee County in NY. My County (Wyoming) hasn't had it come up in a while.

    It's titled:
    E.V.O.C. UTICA MUTUAL EMERGENCY VEHICLE OPERATION

    Leave a comment:


  • pasobuff
    replied
    Originally posted by CaptOldTimer View Post
    A great class for firefighters who are driving fire equipment. All members should have and pass the class.

    I receive my EVOC training from the Virginia Department of Fire Training, in all classes of fire apparatus.

    I was also an department and a state instructor on this as well.
    Even if you don't drive apparatus, it helps you understand what operators deal with when driving - give many a new respect for the apparatus and how hard it can be to steer/brake etc.....

    Leave a comment:


  • pasobuff
    replied
    oh - you say a 2 day class? It isn't OFPC class then - that is 18 hours.....who is sponsoring it? Just curious.....

    Leave a comment:

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