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In house training ideas?

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  • jam24u
    replied
    outside the box

    Sometimes,

    I recommend you think outside the box once in awhile.

    Go over your responding protocols. How to be incident command and 'mutual aid politics. Use of the radios (it will surprise you how many flub radio usage).

    It would be adviseable to address the operations platform or politics of your department. Many eager newbies wanna practice making water and many more senior members want to show off how much they know. Move your sessions once in a while 'Out of your usual comfort mode.'

    Station management is one of those subjects that is often a learn as you go when your finally in that position. You might be great at coordinating an exterior attack and making water, but not so good at public relations with citizens in your area of responsibility or how to appeal to them about asking their support for new equipment or station. Touch how to get the public on your side. In case you haven't noticed, firefighters are not regarded the same way they were ten years ago.

    There is a lot more to being a firefighter than going over the nfpa 1001 FF1 and knowing how to fight a fire.

    Sooo much more. Surprise your membership and touch those areas that will help them become the chief or administrator someday.
    Last edited by jam24u; 04-03-2011, 03:31 PM.

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  • GVFD5
    replied
    Just finished a VERY productive training this evening.

    Training was set up by a local metal fabrication shop (building was big enough for us to pull our rescue truck and ambulance inside) Here are the senerios...

    Senerio #1

    Victim was working on her pickup with Jack Stands under it (no rear tires on) when during this spring thaw the jack stands sunk into the ground and tiped over traping her under the Pass. side rear leaf spring. R.P. could not locate the Jack so we used the rescue air bags off the truck. Making sure to crib the vehicle. EMS team made sure to call for ALS intercept do to MCI.

    Senerio #2

    Late in the day, all the employees had went home when one employee was trying to finish a project and attempting to move a large sheet of steel was pinned under it from the waist down. Again, we used the airbags (very slowly) to raise the sheet off of him. EMS was involved here too!

    Sernerio #3

    MVA - Three kids stole grandpa's truck and went for a joy ride driving off into the ditch. One victim in the bed of the pickup (unresponsive, no pulse)
    Victim #2 went down and under the steering column. Unresponsive, breathing, and possible fractured wrist and Right leg.
    Victim #3 VERY young male under pass. side dash. Unresponsive, obvious head injury, and several fractures.

    This training helped our new rescue captain to dive into triage and to coordinate teams for each pt.

    Just some ideas guys, it was VERY productive for us!!!

    Stay Safe

    FD5

    Leave a comment:


  • drerict
    replied
    We also do our refreshers during the winter: cpr and red card. We also try to do some outside night extrication at recking yards (you are not always going to get mid day 75 degree weather).

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  • fightfor6019
    replied
    Originally posted by tree68 View Post
    It's a good time for preplans - new and review. Pick a location in your district and hash it over. Once the basics are in place, start throwing wrinkles - OOS hydrants, frozen ponds, frozen apparatus, etc.
    absolutly brother, preplanning is key, know your area of fire protection. What kind of construction do i have?, taxpayers? private/multiple dwellings? commerical occupancies,? vacants? old wood frame construction could be balloon? common cocklofts? do your neigboring fire companies/depts who mutual aid you have similar construction?

    remember one thing, fire doesnt kill firemen, illegally converted houses kill firemen. so get to know your area before the poop hits the fan.

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  • tree68
    replied
    Originally posted by fightfor6019 View Post
    Its hard to train during the cold weather months which is actually worse for the fire service being that its fire season.
    It's a good time for preplans - new and review. Pick a location in your district and hash it over. Once the basics are in place, start throwing wrinkles - OOS hydrants, frozen ponds, frozen apparatus, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • fightfor6019
    replied
    Its hard to train during the cold weather months which is actually worse for the fire service being that its fire season.
    Its not a bad idea to watch a training video once in a while and learn from other experienced firemen in the videos on using different techniques to get the job done rather than always using the same guys within the dept to give a training.

    videos range from engine operations to roof rope rescue and everything in between

    Leave a comment:


  • Ctuttle3d
    replied
    as Chewy said black out their masks and have them follow the hose out.... we did this a few weeks ago and timed the guys.... everyone had a lot of fun and wanted to do it multiple times....... teach them how to tell the difference between the male and female couplings and stress the female always leads to trouble..... may offend some folks but works very well for our members

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  • Shrub3234
    replied
    on wheels vehicle stabilazation step chocks and box cribbing, lifting bags if you carry them. done in a nice warm bay

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  • Brick3633
    replied
    "Bumps to the Pump"..

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  • Chewy911
    replied
    Just an added that might come in handy we actually did a couple months back. Go over finding your way by "reading" your couplings.Take a bunch of hose and just pile it all up in a big knot or wad. Make it an absolute mess! Have the one end connected to the truck. Put your guys on air and black out their mask. lead them to it the wad of hose and have them sit there and find there way out. Just like if you got disoriented in a house fire and just found the hose, it will teach them which way leads you to the fire and which way leads you out.

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  • Rice09
    replied
    We have the same weather issues.

    1.- Get some 2x4's and build a temp wall that resembles a residential wall. Build it so it supports itself and get you members to dress in gear and packs. Practice passing throw the studs using different techniques. Might not have to, but the skills come in handy if you have to go through a wall to escape.

    2.- There's nothing wrong with have some training classes sitting around a table and training on scenerios. use a dry erase board and go over SOPS/SOGS in terms of MVAs etc. Show the a,bc and d sides and create different events.

    3.- Practice window escapes.

    4.- Have a smoke machine? Use it. Or blindfold guys and train search and rescue.

    5.- Truck detail is big in the winter. Do a equipment inventory. run all the saws, rescue equipment and othe machines. Reorganize compartments. See where everything is and fine tune the things that never get used.

    6.- Go through all of your airpacks and replaces batteries, inspect hoses and connection, tanks and masks.

    Make sure everyone gets a chance at each drill, but have a circuit training where teams of two are timed in search and rescue. If you have a dummy or a member, hide them and let guys try to find them.

    Leave a comment:


  • pvfd1315
    replied
    I would like to get a few myself but heck we can't even get cars anymore to cut on. Right now junk prices is 12$ for every 100 lbs and all the wreckers are crushing them as soon as they get them in

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  • tree68
    replied
    Originally posted by dragonfyre View Post
    Undeployed bags are not readily available anymore. The manufacturers have real liability problems with popping the bags in an uncontrolled situation.

    I haven't been able to get any for my air bag classes for about 2 years.
    We had some a while back. Got them from a dealer through one of his mechanics (a member here) as a result of some sort of recall.

    I can see why they'd object - the things will fly.

    On the other hand, I've seen Ron Moore (U of Extrication) pop them in place (still mounted in the steering wheel) while he was sitting there. If you're back against the back of the seat, they won't reach you.

    Back to our regularly scheduled thread.

    Leave a comment:


  • dragonfyre
    replied
    Originally posted by fire49 View Post
    Air bag safety

    If you can get some that are not deployed, you can show how fast they inflate
    Undeployed bags are not readily available anymore. The manufacturers have real liability problems with popping the bags in an uncontrolled situation.

    I haven't been able to get any for my air bag classes for about 2 years.

    Leave a comment:


  • pvfd1315
    replied
    I want to thank all of you for your ideas some we have done and some we have not so this should keep us busy for a few weeks if any more ideas pop up please let me know.......Thanks again!!

    Leave a comment:

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