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  • #16
    Originally posted by FIRE117 View Post
    One of the difficulties I see that younger volunteers have with participating (training sessions, meetings, etc.) is child care.

    As a father of a 2-month old I can definitely relate. I've already missed two workers because I was on baby duty. I wouldn't change it for the world, but it's hard to comfort a collicy baby while listening to the scanner .

    The idea of Child care has come up at our station.. in fact just last week someone brought up the idea. Mainly it was enveloped in the idea of getting the spouses/significant others more involved and bring in more opportunities for both the members and families to socialize.

    One idea was that one of the wives (I'm picking a gender here.. roles could obviously be reversed) could come up with her husband when the pager goes off. The other responders could come up with their kids and she would babysit. It's an interesting idea but I don't know how easy it would be to manage.. not to mention that at least in my case by the time I get the 2-month old in the car seat I'm missing the truck..
    So you call this your free country
    Tell me why it costs so much to live
    -3dd

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by voyager9 View Post
      The other responders could come up with their kids and she would babysit. It's an interesting idea but I don't know how easy it would be to manage.
      I think it's a great idea - but I see the real possibility for abuse.

      Just like we have a small group that seems to show up for everything while others find other things to do, I foresee certain spouses who assume that "Marge" will be there and there's no sense of them going down. In fact, hubby can take the kids down to the station while he's at the fire and wifey can enjoy a little quiet time, or maybe even go shopping, sans kids.

      Eventually, "Marge" gets tired of managing beaucoup kids all by herself for every call and gives it up. The program collapses.

      There is also the eventuality that no caregivers would be available (we'll assume legitimately) either immediately or at all, meaning that a firefighter must remain at the station to watch the kids.

      Then one has to assume that there are even suitable facilities at the station to run such a "day care" center.

      That doesn't mean it's a bad idea, but we need to consider the possibilities both positive and negative.
      Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

      Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by tree68 View Post
        There is also the eventuality that no caregivers would be available (we'll assume legitimately) either immediately or at all, meaning that a firefighter must remain at the station to watch the kids.
        I know the guys, and there is no way I'm letting any of them anywhere near my daughter unsupervised.
        So you call this your free country
        Tell me why it costs so much to live
        -3dd

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by tree68 View Post
          I think it's a great idea - but I see the real possibility for abuse.
          ...
          That doesn't mean it's a bad idea, but we need to consider the possibilities both positive and negative.
          Yup, as with most systems it has to be set up and managed correctly. Where I see it having some merit and also unintended benefits is if it were set up where the all the wives and kids respond.. while the FF's are off on the call the wives hang out/chat..etc and the kids play. Could work well if the wives/kids get along well..then they'd want to go on calls. Added benefit in that if it is a working fire someone would be at the station to make coffee or order food for afterwards. (or even get involved in organizing cover companies..etc).

          The problem could be with demographics. It's aiming at a pretty niche segment of the membership. A younger couple interesting in socializing with young children. The older segment.. those already established social circles outside the department may not want to participate.. in the same vein the girl/boyfriends of members probably won't either.. obviously these are generalities..
          So you call this your free country
          Tell me why it costs so much to live
          -3dd

          Comment


          • #20
            2. Grumble and moan about it.

            We have 34 members, but only 7 are EMTs. We have 3 FF2's, 4 FF1's and the rest our VFF.

            We ran 240 calls last year, 205 the year before.

            We have a core group of 8-12 that are on almost every call, and 7-8 members who make less then 30 a year. The average is around 50-60 i would say.

            We have a passive Cheif who is afriad of "pushing" members away, so his speech is always the same, "Good job guys, we do what we can and everyone is equal".

            Very frustrating.

            For what its worth, im a FF2/EMT and i made 130 calls. Working part time and going to school. I ranked 4th out of 34.

            Comment


            • #21
              I used to be one of those no-show ff's a couple months after I joined but after one or two one-on-one conversations with the chief I turned myself around to be one of the top responding members on the depatment. As a member of the personnel board I tend to give MIA members a little bit more time than most people because I know that a member will eventually catch the bug on their own if you let them.

              Most of the time these members are doing no harm by not responding so instead of potentially losing a great asset, give them time and space to figure out their role on the department, and you will gain or regain some excellent firefighters.

              Comment


              • #22
                Yeah..........

                Originally posted by voyager9 View Post
                I know the guys, and there is no way I'm letting any of them anywhere near my daughter unsupervised.

                About 14 years from now, remember that......

                All 4 of our Daughters married into the Fire Service, and 3 out of 4 are/were members themselves. Grandkids are now involved, with the oldest Grandson recently cleared to Drive all Apparatus. It appears to run in the Family, His 2 year old Daughter gets in the Drivers seat and doesn't want to get out....
                Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
                In memory of
                Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
                Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

                IACOJ Budget Analyst

                I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

                www.gdvfd18.com

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by voyager9 View Post
                  As a father of a 2-month old I can definitely relate. I've already missed two workers because I was on baby duty. I wouldn't change it for the world, but it's hard to comfort a collicy baby while listening to the scanner .
                  ..
                  I have 4 kids 6-11yr. Trust me, you don't have either of the items of equipment a 2m old cares anything about. Forget the PC empathy BS it's not going to get you anything. Go to the call where you can accomplish something useful.

                  Kid room is something we've talked about but not attempted. Directing a group of wives can be harder than hurding cats.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by fireinfo10 View Post
                    I have 4 kids 6-11yr. Trust me, you don't have either of the items of equipment a 2m old cares anything about. Forget the PC empathy BS it's not going to get you anything. Go to the call where you can accomplish something useful.
                    Lol. Thanks for the advice. I think I'll file that under "if I ever want to be a single parent".
                    So you call this your free country
                    Tell me why it costs so much to live
                    -3dd

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by hwoods View Post
                      About 14 years from now, remember that......

                      All 4 of our Daughters married into the Fire Service, and 3 out of 4 are/were members themselves. Grandkids are now involved, with the oldest Grandson recently cleared to Drive all Apparatus. It appears to run in the Family, His 2 year old Daughter gets in the Drivers seat and doesn't want to get out....
                      There's something wrong when an entire crew has the same name on the back of their PPE.. Usually we find that sort of thing closer to the Pine Barrens.
                      So you call this your free country
                      Tell me why it costs so much to live
                      -3dd

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        To be honest,I don't know what the policy at my old department was.It could be a letter reminding them that they've missed enough training and/or calls that loss of membership is possible or if the Chief sent a few of "the boys" over to the MIA member's home to pay a visit in the middle of the night.
                        I do know that the Chief at the time I was on would do everything but rent a bus and drive around picking people up to carry them to training.He had the philosophy of "If I feed them,they will come" which worked rather well.
                        We also seemed to get calls during mutual training sessions which impressed our neighbors because before the aforementioned culinary gitdowns,the officers would break out who brought what PPE (required to be brought if you rode the rig to the other station where the training was) and who was going to do what on which type of calls.
                        Yes,we had people who barely made the minimum training sessions,calls and the annual Christmas Dinner.They didn't want to miss a free meal with their points check being handed out.
                        But,we also had the people who'd make as many calls as their work schedules or family situations would let them make and beyond.
                        Babysitting depended on whose wife came along.Most folks made sure that the kids weren't along if they responded POV but I've seen a few shiny faces peeking out from the windows of "Daddy's truck" while on scene.I never agreed with the idea of bringing the kids to a call.What if we had to pull out and their Daddy was the one still inside?

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Of course, if enough people aren't showing up, you can just shut the department down.
                          Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

                          Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by doughesson View Post
                            To be honest,I don't know what the policy at my old department was.It could be a letter reminding them that they've missed enough training and/or calls that loss of membership is possible or if the Chief sent a few of "the boys" over to the MIA member's home to pay a visit in the middle of the night.
                            I do know that the Chief at the time I was on would do everything but rent a bus and drive around picking people up to carry them to training.He had the philosophy of "If I feed them,they will come" which worked rather well.
                            We also seemed to get calls during mutual training sessions which impressed our neighbors because before the aforementioned culinary gitdowns,the officers would break out who brought what PPE (required to be brought if you rode the rig to the other station where the training was) and who was going to do what on which type of calls.
                            Yes,we had people who barely made the minimum training sessions,calls and the annual Christmas Dinner.They didn't want to miss a free meal with their points check being handed out.
                            But,we also had the people who'd make as many calls as their work schedules or family situations would let them make and beyond.
                            Babysitting depended on whose wife came along.Most folks made sure that the kids weren't along if they responded POV but I've seen a few shiny faces peeking out from the windows of "Daddy's truck" while on scene.I never agreed with the idea of bringing the kids to a call.What if we had to pull out and their Daddy was the one still inside?
                            I agree about the whole bringing the kids on the call with you in your POV. I have responded with the kids a couple times. But only with the wife with me, If its just me and the kids, looks like im going to have to sit this one out. Could never imagine if I had the kids with with me on a structure fire and I didnt make it out.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              One way to get your chief on board (hopefully) is demonstrate the liability of having members who do not participate in training. God help your department if something tragic happens, NIOSH comes in, and sees Firefighter NoShow had 20 hours of training for the year. The fines and penalties can bankrupt a department.

                              Tax payers expect more from us these days. As an organization, you need to establish firm rules as to what is expected of members. The Rotary club mandates certain levels of particpation in activies; why don't we?

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by FyrnResQ View Post
                                One way to get your chief on board (hopefully) is demonstrate the liability of having members who do not participate in training. God help your department if something tragic happens, NIOSH comes in, and sees Firefighter NoShow had 20 hours of training for the year. The fines and penalties can bankrupt a department.

                                Tax payers expect more from us these days. As an organization, you need to establish firm rules as to what is expected of members. The Rotary club mandates certain levels of particpation in activies; why don't we?
                                You do realize in the volunteer world - some places only schedule 22-24 hours of training a year - its 2hrs/month or one night a month. In the case above - that was attending every normally scheduled training event.

                                Comment

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