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  • HAFD112
    replied
    I'd be happy to get 20 hours of firefighting training let alone driving.

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Yep!...........

    Originally posted by KuhShise View Post
    Harv & tree: Thanks for the lessons in train handling. Even though there were some tongue-in-cheek answers in the replies... Good chuckles too!
    hafd112, I would not want to start a new driver out on my biggest piece. Handling a 79,500 lb aerial with an 11 ft rear overhang and playing around on 10% grades, just isn't my idea of of fun training a new operator. Just try operating this sort of high center-of-gravity vehicle with air ride suspension down a macadam road with two gullies that it wants to climb up first one side and then the other, and then try to keep the new driver from making any fast wheel moves and getting scared. It is a sure way to scare the bejesus out of the trainee and the trainer. I gotta agree with Harv... Ease Into It!
    "Ease" is the thing....... I've never put anything in the Ditch, and I've never Broken a Knuckle. (I have been accused of Driving up the Price of Sand though..... )

    Leave a comment:


  • KuhShise
    replied
    Harv & tree: Thanks for the lessons in train handling. Even though there were some tongue-in-cheek answers in the replies... Good chuckles too!
    hafd112, I would not want to start a new driver out on my biggest piece. Handling a 79,500 lb aerial with an 11 ft rear overhang and playing around on 10% grades, just isn't my idea of of fun training a new operator. Just try operating this sort of high center-of-gravity vehicle with air ride suspension down a macadam road with two gullies that it wants to climb up first one side and then the other, and then try to keep the new driver from making any fast wheel moves and getting scared. It is a sure way to scare the bejesus out of the trainee and the trainer. I gotta agree with Harv... Ease Into It!

    Leave a comment:


  • MonkeyBiz
    replied
    we have 10 apparatus. you have to log 2 hours drive time each, show competency on the pumps, and then for the Ariel have 5 hours of drive time/ ladder operation. Compentency on the hovercraft on land, water and ice, (usually around 4-5 hours) then then jet skis(min 1 hour).

    That just gets you to the point that you can drive back from calls with an officer. Then when the officer feels like it, you can run emergency with them riding in the officer's chair until they feel comfortable, usually 10-20 calls. Then you can now drive the truck by your self. BTW.. non of this even takes place till after you have ALL you certficiation FF1/2, EVO, WF, HzOps, min MFR, ICS ect. Usually hire to rolling tires solo...2 - 2.5 years, if you work hard.
    Last edited by MonkeyBiz; 10-18-2010, 12:16 AM.

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  • iggerz
    replied
    My Department doesn't have a system, but the guy with the most experience is usually the one to drive!
    All trucks handle different.....our 1975 International 3 ton 4X4 handles alot different than the 2005 C6500 Chevy 4X4, Which handles alot differant than the 2009 4 door 5 passanger Freightliner, Which handles alot differant than a 1979 Chevy Tandam axil Wheat Truck hauling 550 bushels of wheat!


    btw......Just because you can pass all the tests doesn't mean you should drive....I have been on some grass fires with some of our most experienced guys and thought I was going to burn up because they stalled out the International in 6ft CRP grass.......

    Leave a comment:


  • JTFIRE80
    replied
    Originally posted by FWDbuff View Post
    Just out of curiosity, why?
    Just a CYA for now. I firmly believe it will be mandatory in a few years, so why not be ahead of the curve! Oh, and the FD isn't paying for it!!

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Hmmm........

    Originally posted by tree68 View Post
    The station is on a bit of a grade. Leaving going north, your slack is already stretched. Leaving going south, just release the brakes and let it roll...

    Just to throw a monkey wrench into the works (and throw the thread a little further off track), right now we're working with a 1950-ish F unit and doing push moves whenever we go south (six miles in one direction, nearly 11 in the other)... No dragging the train to a stop when you're pushing...

    And if you saw our profile (varies from 1500' elevation at the lowest point to around 1750' at the highest on our "local" trips) which includes some 1% grades and 5.5 degree curves...

    I'll get my time in the seat next year.

    Yep. Sanders get a workout there.........

    Leave a comment:


  • tree68
    replied
    Originally posted by hwoods View Post
    Come on Man, That's Train Handling??...... Try This: Release the Train Line, Then the Independent, Come out of the hole in Run 8 with the Amps in the Red and the Sand working full on all units..... Oh yeah, try for a 15 Horsepower per ton ratio...........


    Seriously, Try turning up the retainers on the last car and run that way all the time. Should quiet the Slack action without causing Traction Motor overheating.....
    The station is on a bit of a grade. Leaving going north, your slack is already stretched. Leaving going south, just release the brakes and let it roll...

    Just to throw a monkey wrench into the works (and throw the thread a little further off track), right now we're working with a 1950-ish F unit and doing push moves whenever we go south (six miles in one direction, nearly 11 in the other)... No dragging the train to a stop when you're pushing...

    And if you saw our profile (varies from 1500' elevation at the lowest point to around 1750' at the highest on our "local" trips) which includes some 1% grades and 5.5 degree curves...

    I'll get my time in the seat next year.

    Leave a comment:


  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Originally posted by hwoods View Post
    Come on Man, That's Train Handling??...... Try This: Release the Train Line, Then the Independent, Come out of the hole in Run 8 with the Amps in the Red and the Sand working full on all units..... Oh yeah, try for a 15 Horsepower per ton ratio...........


    Seriously, Try turning up the retainers on the last car and run that way all the time. Should quiet the Slack action without causing Traction Motor overheating.....
    Didnt you mean to say "crack the injectors open while opening the main steam valve and have the fireman start shoveling?"

    Leave a comment:


  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Originally posted by JTFIRE80 View Post
    Effective April 2011, must have CDL w/air brake endorsement to drive any front line apparatus.
    Just out of curiosity, why?

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  • JTFIRE80
    replied
    Utility vehicles require 10 hours driving.
    Engine's require 10 hours driving, 10 hours pumping EACH.
    Truck(w/pump) requires 10 hours driving, 10 hours pumping, 10 hours flying.

    Must have EVOC, Pump 1 prior to being signed off. Effective April 2011, must have CDL w/air brake endorsement to drive any front line apparatus.

    Leave a comment:


  • LaFireEducator
    replied
    We require 3 total hours on the smaller trucks (light rescue, service trucks and brush truck which are all on either F350 or F450 chassis), then 6 hours on the commercial pumpers (1000g water tanks w/ identical chassis)) and 4 additional hours on the custom pumper and heavy rescue (identical chassis).

    The 3000g tanker and 2 3000g pumper-tankers are next, and we have no standard times for those. Most members require 3-5 hours of driving time to be checked off.

    We have 3 pre-determined routes that a driver must drive with an officer after they have completed the required time to be certified.

    For the the pumpers, they also must demonstrate a set of pre-determined skills including pumping an attack line, pumping the deck gun, taking on water from another truck, refilling the tank, pumping a foam line, switching to a dedicated source, drafting and emergency source to tank switchback procedures.

    We also have a 6000g tractor-trailer tanker. Driving that vehicle is reserved for members with documented 18-wheeler or heavy truck experience.

    We generally do not begin driver training until the member has hit the one-year mark, unless they have previous fire service driving experience.
    Last edited by LaFireEducator; 10-14-2010, 04:31 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • BoxAlarm187
    replied
    Originally posted by HAFD112 View Post
    I guess I just don't see why you need so much time on each piece. If you certify on a 3000 gal tandem axle tanker, why do I need hours in a parking lot on a pumper? Train on the biggest most complicated and rest are common sense.
    The 1-ton truck with 250 gallons of water is going to have far different handling characteristics than the 3000 gallon dual-axle tanker. The firefighters need to learn each vehicle....it's not the idea if you can drive 'em big, you can drive 'em small.

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Huh...........

    Originally posted by KuhShise View Post
    tree68, How do you stop a passenger train so that the slack is all out and you dont shake the S*** out of the passengers when you pull out of the station? ? - Drop the train air 15 lbs and then power the engine enough to keep the slack out until the car brakes drag you to a stop?
    Come on Man, That's Train Handling??...... Try This: Release the Train Line, Then the Independent, Come out of the hole in Run 8 with the Amps in the Red and the Sand working full on all units..... Oh yeah, try for a 15 Horsepower per ton ratio...........


    Seriously, Try turning up the retainers on the last car and run that way all the time. Should quiet the Slack action without causing Traction Motor overheating.....
    Last edited by hwoods; 10-14-2010, 03:58 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Yeah.....

    I see your Point, but isn't it easier to work up than down? As a little Kid, I started Hunting AFTER a good Hunter's Safety Course, and worked my way up from a .22 and a .410 to the 12 Gauge........... A strong case was made for being a SAFE Hunter as well as a COMPETENT Hunter. I see Driving in the same light as Hunting. "Work your way up, and always Work Safe" is Rule 1 with me......

    Leave a comment:

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