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Chimney Fire Equipment

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  • tree68
    replied
    Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    Seems like everybody has it covered.

    Besides, it's hard to think about chimney fires when it's 95 degrees and we are chasing brush fires all day.
    Yep - had 34 degrees (Fahrenheit) two days ago... Chimney fire season is upon us...

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  • LaFireEducator
    replied
    Seems like everybody has it covered.

    Besides, it's hard to think about chimney fires when it's 95 degrees and we are chasing brush fires all day.

    Leave a comment:


  • ffmedcbk1
    replied
    Originally posted by Fireeaterbob View Post
    We carry something akin to Fyred Ups along with a pail and scoop, but I LIKE the hand tool idea... I've made more thant a trip or two to the truck to get em.
    don't people carry 6IN1 screwdriver and vice grips in your pockets?

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  • Capt387
    replied
    Originally posted by PaladinKnight View Post
    I can only go on what you describe for the chain, but it sounds right. I'd like to see the picture of the sniffer nozzle. Add some chimney bombs and I think you're set.
    Hey Knight, I heard the Chem Flex, chim flex or whatever the company was called. It is the flare thing you just ignite and put in the stove/fireplace. The company burned down several years ago. I saw an add a few days ago but forgot to look for a website

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  • FyredUp
    replied
    Originally posted by tree68 View Post
    Indeed. That's how many old-timers cleaned their chimneys....
    There is a major difference between having a hot fire to burn out minimal creosote buildup and having a chimney full of creosote caused soot and ash that catches on fire and blows like a welding torch.

    Any competent wood burner will have a good hot fire on a regular basis to remove that buildup. Usually a blowing chimney fire is caused by one of 3things and sometimes a combination of the 3: 1) An inexperienced wood burner 2) Using green, wet wood 3) Closing the damper and not allowing free burning fires to eliminate most of the creosote.
    Last edited by FyredUp; 09-23-2010, 06:30 PM.

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  • tree68
    replied
    Originally posted by islandfire03 View Post
    Some wood burners feel that once they have a chimney fire they're good to continue.
    Indeed. That's how many old-timers cleaned their chimneys....

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  • islandfire03
    replied
    Our chimney kits consist of:

    20 gallon metal trash can with raised bottom containing:
    fiberglass mat to put on floor under can while shoveling out coals
    4 pair heavy leather welding gloves
    1 heavy duty pair of log tongs
    metal coal shovel
    metal mirror
    60 feet of 3/8" chain with carabiner on each end
    old iron window weight
    6 & 8" wire brush
    dry chem extender nozzle[ 3 ft length of 1" garden house with fitting to screw into extinguisher] makes it easy to direct the dry chem up the chimney to the source of fire
    6,8,& 10 inch flue caps to close off flue if we remove stove pipe
    Thermal hot spotter sensor to check temps.
    extendo mirror to look into clean out door

    All of this along with a 12' x3' heavy hall runner, a 10lb abc extinguisher , a 2 1/2 pw can and thermal imager are in the rear side compartment on both our engines.We also have a set of fiberglass rods with chisel point and brush attachments for them.

    We average a half a dozen real working chimney fires per heating season along with quite a few where the blast furnace has resolved before we arrive on scene. Some wood burners feel that once they have a chimney fire they're good to continue.

    We do not clean the chimney for the homeowner. we mitigate the risk of the chimney fire extending and burning down the house.
    We tell them not to burn again until they have it inspected and professionally cleaned by a licensed professional.

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  • tree68
    replied
    Originally posted by LVFD301 View Post
    We don't chain chimneys any more. To much liability.

    We do use dry chem bombs however. No water.
    We have the ability to "condemn" a chimney, which forces the homeowner to have it inspected before it is used again. We don't claim to be chimney experts, so this gives us a nice out if the homeowner decides to light things up again right after we leave.

    I remember reading about a fire department that had a technique for putting water in a chimney - something about short bursts and fine fog, IIRC. Fortunately, I don't remember enough about it to actually try it....

    We have been known to help the homeowner take a chimney down when it was obvious that it would have to be replace. That generally has been a case where a masonry chimney runs up the side of a house.
    Last edited by tree68; 09-22-2010, 07:00 PM. Reason: Additional thoughts.

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  • L-Webb
    replied
    You mean you don't stick a 1.75 flowing 150 gpm down the top, and destroy the chimney, fire bricks in the stove and the carpet??? Saw it once, wasn't me, CHIEF WASN"T VERY UNDERSTANDING.

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  • LVFD301
    replied
    Originally posted by DoubleOSpoon View Post
    Hey guys, was unable to locate anything via search so I figured I'd ask here.

    Our fire department just purchased a new first due fire engine. On our old rig, we've got a chimney fire bucket. In it we have the snuffer nozzle, and a long chain that branches out on both ends. We lower this down to clear the soot as I'm sure many other departments do.

    I was wondering if anyone had a specialized tool or setup in order to accomplish this task? We may end up using the same setup on the new engine, but I know I've seen specialized tools I just can't seem to find anything online. Links to vendors who carry such products is appreciated.

    Thanks for the feedback guys.
    We don't chain chimneys any more. To much liability.

    We do use dry chem bombs however. No water.

    Leave a comment:


  • sq51kmg365
    replied
    We use a large weight at the end of a chain drop it down and crews at the bottom attached a wire chimney brush then we pull it back up and do this a couple of times. Dry chem, metal bucket and scooper and a periscope with bottom crew. Charged line at the door and we try and put floor runners down if its not that serious too.

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  • Fireeaterbob
    replied
    Originally posted by Eng34FF View Post
    We also have some small hand tools (screwdrivers, pliers, vice-grips) to help remove the caps. Also salvage covers and a large pail to remove contents of the firebox.
    We carry something akin to Fyred Ups along with a pail and scoop, but I LIKE the hand tool idea... I've made more thant a trip or two to the truck to get em.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nick SBFD 6
    replied
    We carry a chain attached to an old window weight. It's been in service for longer than I've been alive. Works great.

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  • Catch22
    replied
    Originally posted by Blulakr View Post
    Ditto with us minus the water. Water can damage the chimney.
    We don't spray it up the chimney, rather on the wood/coals and let the steam go up and snuff the fire out.

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  • Blulakr
    replied
    Originally posted by Catch22 View Post
    An electric vent fan and a dry-chem (or water can works in a pinch) is all we carry. Leave the knock-down of the creosote for the chimney sweeps after we leave. And we always tell them they need to find a someone to clean the chimney before they start another fire.

    We used to do the whole chain thing, but we had too many instances where the homeowners felt we cleaned out the chimney enough to use it and they didn't need to call the chimney sweep. That's too much liability for my taste.
    Ditto with us minus the water. Water can damage the chimney.

    Leave a comment:

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