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  • #46
    Well I volunteer in one state but work in another plus travel though DC on a daily basis. In my time, I have stopped at MVA's both in VA and MD, so far not DC. Each time, without fail having something to ID me as a fire fighter helps. So it is usually a traffic vest, rain gear or a shirt and I haven't had a problem with the LEO's or the local fire department.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by tree68 View Post
      And I believe it is/was Vermont which required EMTs to place ID on their vehicle and to stop and render aid. Corrections/updates welcome.
      Vermont does have a law which requires both EMTs and private citizens to stop and render aid.

      Both are covered under Good Samaritan laws, but obviously the standard for gross negligence is much different for untrained citizens than it is for trained responders.
      Train to fight the fires you fight.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
        Vermont does have a law which requires both EMTs and private citizens to stop and render aid.
        Oh I bet that would p i s s you off if La. had that law.
        "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

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        • #49
          Originally posted by FWDbuff View Post
          Oh I bet that would p i s s you off if La. had that law.
          Actually, it would.

          EMTs,firefighters or paramedics should not be required to operate out of district unless there is some type of mechanism that provides medical and wage coverage. My department has certain situations, such as riding in a department vehicle or traveling to/from training and conferences, where we are required to stop out of district. In those cases, both the career and volunteer members are covered as if they were operating at an in-district incident. There is no legal or department requirement
          to stop at in-district calls unless you are on-duty, which is defined by state law as receiving pay at that time, and none out of district except for the department requirements outlined above.

          I beleive the law it Vermont did that for fire personnel as it allowed the department's insurance and workman's comp to come into play if they were injured.
          Train to fight the fires you fight.

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          • #50
            I just reread my previous post and need to clarify. The patients needed ALS treatment the several times where the medic was stuck riding with the unit. It was an ethical dilema, not a legal dilema, if they leave the patient with that crews the patient had a decent chance of not making it to the hospital alive, but by riding with the crew that patients odds improved dramatically.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
              Actually, it would.

              EMTs,firefighters or paramedics should not be required to operate out of district unless there is some type of mechanism that provides medical and wage coverage. My department has certain situations, such as riding in a department vehicle or traveling to/from training and conferences, where we are required to stop out of district. In those cases, both the career and volunteer members are covered as if they were operating at an in-district incident. There is no legal or department requirement
              to stop at in-district calls unless you are on-duty, which is defined by state law as receiving pay at that time, and none out of district except for the department requirements outlined above.

              I beleive the law it Vermont did that for fire personnel as it allowed the department's insurance and workman's comp to come into play if they were injured.
              God forbid it would be the right thing to do.........
              "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

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              • #52
                How we handle this.....

                With my Department going ALS 5 or 6 months ago, we ran into this. How we handled the ALS/BLS Staffed Unit is that our Medics make Base Station contact and advise what they have. Many times our Base Station will release our Medic and allow us to pass Patient Care.

                As far as the situation where the ALS Pt. Care was needed then I would recommend doing the same thing. Make Base Station contact, advise them what you have and if not released then either ride-in or provide Pt. Care until an ALS Unit is available to respond to the scene. The BLS Provider could contact their Supervisor and advise them what is going on and tell them they need the next available ALS Unit to respond priority. Even if it's a Medic Assessment Engine or the ALS Supervisor themselves, the off-duty Medic can pass care to the on-duty Medic and continue on his road trip. The whole "Professional Courtesy" thought process.....

                Just trying to spin a different outlook on the situation.....
                Last edited by mikeyboy; 11-14-2010, 04:19 PM.
                "Be LOUD, Be PROUD..... It just might save your can someday when goin' through an intersection!!!!!"

                Life on the Truck (Quint) is good.....

                Eat til you're sleepy..... Sleep til you're hungry..... And repeat.....

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