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Math section of the Civil Service exam

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  • Math section of the Civil Service exam

    Hey guys,

    I need a good refresher for the math portion of the civil service exam. It's been a four years since I've been in a math class, and I've allowed my skills to slip because I depend on calculators.

    Anyway, can anyone recommend some good math-skills study resources (websites or books)?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Chief Lepore's book, Smoke Your Firefighter Written exam is full of all kinds of math problems. The book is not just questions and answers. It actually teaches you how to work out each problem. it's really comprehensive....
    http://www.aspiringfirefighters.com

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    • #3
      Its mostly basic stuff.. I think the hardest thing I ever remember them having for math was fractions.. thats about it.

      http://math.about.com/od/fractions/F..._Tutorials.htm

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      • #4
        Thanks guys for replying. I'll make sure and study the fractions well (that seems to be a pretty good amount of what's in the civil service exam guide that I got from the Library).

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        • #5
          I can't speak to the exam you're going to be taking, as I've not taken it (and I believe its an American exam, so probably won't be taking it up in Canada), but...

          I've found the following texts to be great learning texts for general math:
          -Calculus, Early Transcendentals (Stewart, 6E)
          -Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction (Thomson, 2E)
          -Discrete Mathematics with Applications (Thomson, 3E)

          The third deals primarily with logic and mathematical proofs; I've found it to be a good reference to have around even when dealing with problems that aren't math based.

          Grecko

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          • #6
            I've taken severl exams over the past year. Of course basic addition/subtraction is a MUST! Know how to calculate areas of objects...BxH for squares, rectangles, etc. 1/2BxH triangles, PIxRxR ('pi x Radius squared'). Just freshen up on fractions, multiplications, and simple algebraic equations.

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