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Oral board question I can't figure out

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  • Shawshank
    replied
    I think what the board is looking for is to see that you can handle a problem or conflict at its simplest form.(FF to FF) I think you should immediately ask the engineer if he knew he was eating your lunch. If he says no, then it is more than likely an honest mistake. If he says yes, then it is obviously malicious or to get a rise out of you. From here you can go without lunch everyday or bring the issue up the chain of command.(Lt. or Capt.) Most boards don't want to see you run to the officers with everything. They want to see that you can address problems on your own.

    Leave a comment:


  • pasobuff
    replied
    Originally posted by BCLepore View Post

    We asked a similar issue a few years back whee there was no right answer. We put the candidates in a now win situation. The question went like this:

    You are a rookie firefighter who shows up on his first day. You are carrying your uniforms and personal gear. As you enter teh back door of the fire station, you are doused with a bucket of water. What would you do?


    The answers were predictable (at least most of them). The candidates would put on a dry uniform.....

    The next shift the same thing happens...... The answers were again predictable - I would look up next time.......

    The next shift the same thing happens.......now the candidates got flustered.

    The best answer I heard was one guy (who we hired) said that he would figure out who was responsible for the water dropping and get in early and put on HIS uniform. Now when he got water dropped he would change back into his OWN dry uniform.

    There is a very strong initiation in the fire service. This is why people who were in the military or who played competitive sports fit in so well......

    Paul Lepore
    Division Chief
    How about USE THE FRONT DOOR??? lol......

    Leave a comment:


  • jbrescue
    replied
    Punch him in the duodenum!

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  • mikeyboy
    replied
    Cookies.....

    This is a situation where the ole "special chocolate chip cookies" comes in handy..... Chocolate flavored XLax..... Gotta luv em.....

    One dose of this and your prized goods will be safe.....

    Leave a comment:


  • JayDudley
    replied
    Oh No!!!

    I sure hope not. If it was he's now my neighbor and I owe him one......LOL

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  • BCLepore
    replied
    Let's tell it like it is.....It was the C-shift Engineer :-)

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  • JayDudley
    replied
    Got it!!

    I have to laugh Paul.....That's been done along with "The sponge in the Chili Rellenos". No matter how many signs on put on the leftovers..."C" Shift always ate them. God I love the firehouse humor.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCLepore
    replied
    I think the best cure-all for someone eating your shift's left overs is Alpo enchiladas. If they eat something with dog food in it that has a "save" on it they deserve it!!!

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  • JayDudley
    replied
    Lunch

    I got it Paul.....sure pick on the Engineers :-{)). I'm in the same boat as you on this however as you were aware when "C" shift always ate our leftovers "Save B" we'd doctor up some delightful enchiladas and just smile when we came back and they were gone.

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  • scfire86
    replied
    I might pack my real lunch and leave it in the car and pack something like sheeps brains for his culinary delight.

    Then we'll see what he's made of.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCLepore
    replied
    This one is very simple. The Engineer (it's always the engineer who causes problems :- ) ) is just pushing you to see what you are made of. I would bring in food and cook for him.

    In the morning I would say to him - "I brought in tuna salad for lunch and I am going to cool enchiladas, rice and beans for dinner. I hope this is ok with you."

    Instead of fighting with him as a power struggle, you are playing back with him. Knowing firefighters like I do this will most likely solve your issue.

    We asked a similar issue a few years back whee there was no right answer. We put the candidates in a now win situation. The question went like this:

    You are a rookie firefighter who shows up on his first day. You are carrying your uniforms and personal gear. As you enter teh back door of the fire station, you are doused with a bucket of water. What would you do?


    The answers were predictable (at least most of them). The candidates would put on a dry uniform.....

    The next shift the same thing happens...... The answers were again predictable - I would look up next time.......

    The next shift the same thing happens.......now the candidates got flustered.

    The best answer I heard was one guy (who we hired) said that he would figure out who was responsible for the water dropping and get in early and put on HIS uniform. Now when he got water dropped he would change back into his OWN dry uniform.

    There is a very strong initiation in the fire service. This is why people who were in the military or who played competitive sports fit in so well......

    Paul Lepore
    Division Chief

    Leave a comment:


  • JayDudley
    replied
    Help

    Wow that was a lot of help.

    Leave a comment:


  • AC1503
    replied
    The best thing is to stop asking dumb questions.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptBob
    replied
    These are scenario based questions.

    This type of questioning is referred to as branching off. They ask a question and not matter what you say they ask more and more about the question. Not a day at the beach. This is an older type of questioning not often used because larger agencies use a structured oral where everyone is asked the same questions. They want to see if you will stick to your answer by backing you in a corner. The wheels will start coming off your wagon if you start changing your answers. Being prepared with your answers in advance is the key here.

    One way to help you with scenario based questions is picture a piece of paper in your mind with a line drawn down the center. On the left of the line are issues dealing with ethics, such as stealing, drugs, or drinking. With ethical issues, you ask appropriate questions to determine what you suspect.

    If true, you don’t deviate . . . you go straight up to a supervisor. On the right side of the line is anything to do with getting along with others; you will go to great lengths to work it out before going to a supervisor. If you can decide what side of the line the question belongs, you have a better chance of knowing how to answer the question.

    The question you were asked has to do with getting along with others. You gave good answers going to great lengths to resolve the issue on your own. The real goal here is at what point you would go to the officer. A point that would have improved your position is saying to the engineer, “I’ve tried everything to resolve this situation. Why don’t we both go to the officer and work it out?”

    We asked a similar question at one oral board where you come in and find the juice you had bought missing. You buy another and it too disappears. Candidates gave answers like I would keep it in my locker. Some said they’re usually 2 refrigerators in a station and maybe it got into the other shifts refer or when the refer was cleaned it was moved.

    But the best answer came from an already in service firefighter who said, “At line up I would ask who stole my dam juice!” He got a top score on that answer.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheGoose32
    replied
    I was wondering what would have been the proper way to handle that situation?

    Leave a comment:

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