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  • johnb
    replied
    MOS,
    How did it go with the weight vest?

    Leave a comment:


  • fdny84
    replied
    stop squatting 400lbs!

    Leave a comment:


  • Slikrthnu
    replied
    Step wide and use the muscles in the upper part of your legs. And count to 190 when your doin it.

    Leave a comment:


  • MANOFSTEEL
    replied
    I think it's about 10 weeks away now. I think I'm going to eb just fine. I'll start adding my 20 pound vest tomorrow and see how that goes.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnb
    replied
    MOS,

    Is your CPAT graded as pass/fail? If you're in decent shape, you should do fine. However, sometimes tests need to be trained for specifically for that test. This is what I did preparing for the CPAT for about 6 weeks ( 3 X a week ): ( as a simulated CPAT at home )

    1) - step-ups: starting with the left foot, step up on a step then step up with the right
    then down with the right and down with the left...then repeat starting with the right foot. I started with 90 steps each leg with 55lbs. on my back the 1st week, then progressing to stepping up 2 steps instead of 1 ( kind of like a lunge ) then on to doing 150 steps each leg with 75lbs.

    *after stepups, walk around for 10 sec.

    2) 25 squats with the 55lbs. on my back, then kneel down and do 30 pulls each arm on an exercise band wrapped around a bedpost. ( when I did this outside, I was able to run the length of my driveway and pull my charged garden hose )

    *after "hosedrag" walk around 10 sec.

    3)carry 2 40lb. DB's around for 30 sec.

    *after "equipment carry" walk around 10 sec.

    4) 25lb. DB presses - quickly - 12 reps each arm then immediately pull down with the exercise band 15 reps each hand.

    *after "ladder raise & extension" walk around 10 sec.

    5) with bike innertube wrapped around a 25lb. DB, secured to the bedpost, 15 swings.

    *after "forcible entry" walk around 10 sec.

    6) crawl on hands & knees with eyes closed for 30 sec.

    *after "search" walk around 10 sec.

    7) deadlift and hold for 40 sec. doing half-squats ( when I first did this, I put all my weights on the bed and lifted one end...outside I was able to have the barbell set with 165lbs. and walked with it...not the same as the dummy )

    *after "dummy drag" walk around 10 sec.

    8) holding 2 25lb. DB's end to end, thrust upward from the hip 5 times, then do 3 rope pullups...repeat 4 times. ( for this evolution, I removed my backpack with 35lbs. in it and only had on my 20lb. weight vest ).

    *After "ceiling breach & pull", I would stretch, hydrate and continue on to do whatever workout planned for the day. By the end of 6 weeks, I was doing a 1.5 - 3 mile run before this "CPAT." A couple of times, I did this at the Y. The indoor track was convenient for the walk & run after the stepmill. Just keep at it and push yourself.

    When is your CPAT? Don't wait to get the weights on too long...your back and balance needs to adjust to having the weight as well.

    Hope this helps...
    J

    Leave a comment:


  • MANOFSTEEL
    replied
    Originally posted by sachse1 View Post
    Manofsteel - How did that tidbit help, the rest step?
    It actually went pretty well. At first I held it a little too long and almost fell off like a dumbass, then had to basically run to the top which was probably tiring me out. After I worked that out it held out well

    Leave a comment:


  • sachse1
    replied
    Manofsteel - How did that tidbit help, the rest step?

    Leave a comment:


  • MANOFSTEEL
    replied
    Originally posted by RidgeRunner78 View Post
    You may want to try doing the "rest step" also. I learned it while backpacking. As soon as you step up on the next step, lock your knee for as long as your foot is on the step. It takes the weight off your muscles and puts it on your leg bones for a second. That equals energy conservation.
    Ill be trying this tomorrow

    Leave a comment:


  • RidgeRunner78
    replied
    You may want to try doing the "rest step" also. I learned it while backpacking. As soon as you step up on the next step, lock your knee for as long as your foot is on the step. It takes the weight off your muscles and puts it on your leg bones for a second. That equals energy conservation.

    Leave a comment:


  • yjbrody64
    replied
    On thing that I learned early on when getting ready for the CPAT was to keep in mind how slow the stairmaster really goes. I have never used the stairmaster to train for the CPAT and have never had a problem with the test, but the mistake that I see guys making is that they train at a higher step rate per minute than the CPAT because they think that faster means they will be more prepared. But at the CPATs slower one step per second rate, it's often more taxing because you are in that stepping motion for a longer duration. Compare it to doing a situp. Which is easier, doing 50 quick situps or doing 50 1-2 second situps? The slower situp is going to tax your muscles more.

    I'm a fan of training your body for exactly what it is going to be tested on (at least for the stair portion). I'd stick as close as you can to the step per second setting.

    Just my opinion... It sounds like you will be more prepared than most.

    Leave a comment:


  • MANOFSTEEL
    replied
    Originally posted by sachse1 View Post
    One small trick I started doing while training for the CPAT was to count my steps in three different groups. After the 20 second warm up, there is 180 steps remaining. The 1st group would be 100, 2nd is 50 and the 3rd is 30. It may not seem like much, but it helped keep my mind on something other than how my legs are feeling and how much I thought it sucked and how... It also let me know how much more I needed to push myself.

    For me, that is the most difficult task in any PAT that I have done... that just kicks my butt.

    Also - You are not required to run right after the stairmaster, you can walk, the majority don't. The run is only gaining you a handful of seconds over walking. I used that time to get my legs back underneath me because they do feel like jello after getting off of it.

    Just a couple of pennies to rub together.
    I'm going to try this. It's funny how the small stuff that occupies your mind helps the most

    Leave a comment:


  • BW21
    replied
    MANOFSTEEL,

    Since you're a fellow powerlifter you should be alright, Do you have access to a decent size truck (like a Tahoe or something along the lines)? Practice pushing that up and down your street or in a parking lot at a low angle. That should help you build up enough endurance in your legs

    Leave a comment:


  • edpmedic
    replied
    You say that you couldn't stand after that initial session? That your legs were wasted? It just so happens that I had the exact same result a few days ago after doing this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvCLxD3BI98

    Actually, I didn't do that. I did only one lap. It took me nearly 1/2 hour. I couldn't even walk more than a few steps at a time for the first couple of minutes, no joke. My first time doing it a few months ago, I did a mere 1/2 lap in around 20 mins.

    Give it just one try, for one half to one lap, and tell me if that doesn't get the job done. Do it today, and tell me how it went. BTW, one lap should be approx. 120 burpees or so, depending on the length of jump.

    Leave a comment:


  • sachse1
    replied
    One small trick I started doing while training for the CPAT was to count my steps in three different groups. After the 20 second warm up, there is 180 steps remaining. The 1st group would be 100, 2nd is 50 and the 3rd is 30. It may not seem like much, but it helped keep my mind on something other than how my legs are feeling and how much I thought it sucked and how... It also let me know how much more I needed to push myself.

    For me, that is the most difficult task in any PAT that I have done... that just kicks my butt.

    Also - You are not required to run right after the stairmaster, you can walk, the majority don't. The run is only gaining you a handful of seconds over walking. I used that time to get my legs back underneath me because they do feel like jello after getting off of it.

    Just a couple of pennies to rub together.

    Leave a comment:


  • moose88
    replied
    MANOFSTEEL: sent you a PM

    Leave a comment:

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