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  • Charged Hose drag

    I have an agility coming up and one of the phases is dragging 150' of charged 1 3/4.

    I want to built a sled or something with weight to train. How much weight should I put in this? I want to make it as close to the actual resistance that I will actually be enduring.

  • #2
    weight

    The exact weight would be nice ...My suggestion would be to have a heavier weight then when you do the event you'll fly through it. The exact weight I haven't a clue but I'm sure those who know will tell you that. This is just my 2 cents.....
    Respectfully,
    Jay Dudley
    Retired Fire
    Background Investigator
    IACOJ-Member
    Lifetime Member CSFA
    IAFF Alumni Member

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    • #3
      We use a charged 2 1/2" drag in our entry level test.
      To practice I have used an old tractor tire with a rope on it, around a parking lot.
      Or I have used a boxing heavy bag (100lbs)with a strap on it, and dragged it around the indoor track at the gym (1/8th mile).
      Good luck.

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      • #4
        The crappy part about the charged line pull is that it gets heavier the further you get...
        You can figure a gallon of water weighs a little under 8.5 lbs and 150' of 1 3/4" hose holds just under 33 gallons. At the end of the pull (figuring you are doing 150' straight and not turning around at 75') you are pulling 280lbs...if you are running 75' then doubling back you will be pulling 140lbs at the most...

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        • #5
          we are going straight. According to the agility outline atleast. It says we will advance 150' of straight charged line.

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          • #6
            I personally did not train specificly for the event...other then crossfit (www.crossfit.com) and using a stair machine with a 55lb backpack for 10 minutes at 60 steps/min.

            If you have decent cardio (sub 9 min pace for 3 miles) and have been in a strength training regiment there is not much to worry about. If you are concerned about it and what it might feel like, or getting the technique down (staying low and choppy feet at the end of the pull) then a sled with a rope is not a bad idea.

            I would think if you load the sled with 140lbs and place another 140lbs at the 75' mark, you could simulate it fairly well. Start your pull and at the 75' mark load the rest of the weight and finish it off. That start stop will work wonders for developing an explosive start.

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            • #7
              Often, candidates don’t realize that it’s not just strength in the physical agility. The “Nugget “ is technique, momentum and grip. I witnessed a 5’ 1” fire lad who was 119 pounds blow through the CPAT leaving the staff shaking their heads.

              Here’s some tips on the hose drag:

              Hose Drag: Get moving! Pick up the nozzle and GO! This is not the time to worry about those rubber legs or try to catch your breath. Use your body weight and momentum to lean forward taking shorter steps as you advance the line when it becomes heavier. MOVE! Go as fast as you can. You may feel the burn in your legs but don't stop. It saps your strength to have to get the hose moving again each time you stop. Don’t forget to breathe!
              _____________________________________________

              "Nothing counts 'til you have the badge . . . Nothing!"

              More Tips on getting hired and promoted by Firehouse Contributing Author Fire “Captain Bob” Articles here:
              http://www.firehouse.com/contact/10544410/bob-smith


              Fire "Captain Bob"

              www.eatstress.com

              Comment


              • #8
                I agree with bob.

                Most people just psych themselves out before a test...just grab it an go..

                Get a low to the ground, lean forward and just keep a solid pace and you will do just fine..
                Just remember to keep moving... it's alot easier to move with the weight in motion rather than to stop and restart the movement and pull against the weight
                As far as the amount of weight to pull.. I would train with much more than what you will actually be pulling. know your own limits...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by STFDQuint3 View Post
                  I have an agility coming up and one of the phases is dragging 150' of charged 1 3/4.
                  Are you associated with a fire department of some sort? (With a handle like "STFDQuint3" one would assume that you are.)

                  The best practice for dragging 150' of charged 1 3/4" line is dragging 150' of charged 1 3/4" line. If there's any line lying around that has failed annual pressure testing you might even be able to take it home to practice.
                  "Nemo Plus Voluptatis Quam Nos Habant"
                  sigpic
                  The Code is more what you'd call "guidelines" than actual rules.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Depending on the pressure they put in the line this shouldn't be a difficult task.

                    At a recent drill for a large city a 90 lb firefighter with less than a year on the department was given an order to get on full gear and advance a charged 1 3/4 line into the training building. The new rookie couldn't budge the charged line. How did this rookie have made it through the academy????? With the truth staring everyone in the face including the training officer they had to let the rookie go.

                    What would have been the real life scenario if there was a call for a man down? You PC tax dollars at work folks.
                    _____________________________________________

                    "Nothing counts 'til you have the badge . . . Nothing!"

                    More Tips on getting hired and promoted by Firehouse Contributing Author Fire “Captain Bob” Articles here:
                    http://www.firehouse.com/contact/10544410/bob-smith


                    Fire "Captain Bob"

                    www.eatstress.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by CaptBob View Post
                      Often, candidates don’t realize that it’s not just strength in the physical agility. The “Nugget “ is technique, momentum and grip. I witnessed a 5’ 1” fire lad who was 119 pounds blow through the CPAT leaving the staff shaking their heads.

                      Here’s some tips on the hose drag:

                      Hose Drag: Get moving! Pick up the nozzle and GO! This is not the time to worry about those rubber legs or try to catch your breath. Use your body weight and momentum to lean forward taking shorter steps as you advance the line when it becomes heavier. MOVE! Go as fast as you can. You may feel the burn in your legs but don't stop. It saps your strength to have to get the hose moving again each time you stop. Don’t forget to breathe!



                      This part is Mind over Matter. In my mind is what counts and nothing else matters!

                      You are not doing this trait to take a line in a fire. You are showing the proctors that you have the ability to pick up the nozzle and some hose line and go from point A to point B in the quickest manner that one can do.

                      Years back before we had to stop the hoisting the roll of 2-1/2" hose up the side of the tower to the 5th floor under the time clock, the HR folks set a time of 30 seconds for the applicants. We told them that wasn't a good time and to cut it in half or 30%, back to 15 or even 20 seconds.

                      They claimed it couldn't be done in those terms.

                      At the time I was a 40 year old Lieutenant, assigned as an Instructor and I went to the fifth floor, got into the 5th floor window, positioned myself and hoisted the roll of hose in 10 seconds. Not once, but 5 times in a row to show the HR goobers that it can be done if you put your mind to it.

                      They said I had a advantage since I was on the job and knew how to do it!

                      Go figure!


                      This task was an eliminator as is the hose drag is today.
                      Stay Safe and Well Out There....

                      Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

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