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    clark918
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • clark918
    replied
    About that salvage comment, my instructor told me a story this year about one day on the job. Everything was calm and under control. Then kind of a lsat minute thing he saw a painting sitting near water. He told someone to move it onto the couch and cover it. He then got a letter a few days later thanking all of them. Guess the painting was worth thousands of dollars. Just goes to show that small things like that really are appreciated. Especially when those are the people paying the taxes.

    Leave a comment:

  • tecrsq
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • tecrsq
    replied
    Congrats on your first extinguishment, you will expand your comfort zone with every fire as they get progressively larger.

    Always be the eyes and ears for your crewmembers, always remember the basics and always approach things with an open mind!

    Stay safe on the job!

    Leave a comment:

  • thomas15
    Forum Member

  • thomas15
    replied
    A couple of weeks ago I was sent into a basement to do a primary search. The fire was located upstairs and I wasn't expecting to find anything. There were three of us, one was an officer and the other doing interior for the 1st or second time. Water was starting to drip through the floors so I mentioned to the officer that we should to get some salvage tarps and he agreeded with me.

    We gathered many books, a piano, media center and so forth into piles and covered them. I found out later that the people were delighted that the firefighters did this for them. And I'm thrilled because I'm starting think like a fireman, protecting life and property.

    We have had quite a number of fires this year, mostly in our mutual aid areas but it has given me an opportunity to see many different situations. Several of these fires have been large surround and drown but the ones that are the most satisfying are the small ones that we keep from becoming big ones. I know I have alot to learn and a lot to experience and I make mistakes but I look forward training and doing what is expected of me. I train a lot outside of drill (state fire school). The 3rd guy in my team doing the salvage job I mentioned above started in the fire service the same month I did in 2004 but he has not had much fire school and is away at college. To be fair he is doing good for the amount of time he has available to train but the difference between our skills is big and is useful for me to guage my progress.

    Everyone wants to be on the knob and make the hit or open the roof from the stick (me included) and usually they are the ones who the newspaper snap pictures of but the people who own the place don't go around telling their friends and neighbors about how thoughtful is the guy who cut a 4 x 4 hole in the roof, rather they tell them about the guys that have no name but moved their living room furnature into the garage so that it wouldn't get ruined. Don't get me wrong, ventilation is important and you have to do overhaul, it's all part of the job but starting to get a feel for what has or could be done is what I'm talking about and it is a great feeling for me to be a more useful member of the team.

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  • doughesson
    Forum Member

  • doughesson
    replied
    Couple years ago when we were doing the FF 1 and 2 skills,one of our newer members who had joined as an EMT commented after the fire suppression part that he was NOT enamored of interior work but he'd do any medical work outside.And all it was was a couple pallets set in a 55 gallon drum and set on fire.
    Even so,I am sure he'd be one raising his hand to go in and drag any of us out during a collapse or other major problem.
    It doesn't mean he's unsuited to being a volunteer firefighter,it just means that he knows what his limits are.
    Like others have said,learn all you can but remember to think before rushing in so you don't get hurt and make an already bad day even worse.
    I don't think any of us have ever had a scene where mistakes were NOT made.It just means that we have to do like Clint Eastwood said and "Improvise,adapt and overcome".
    Training can only do so much so every chance you get,pick an officer's brain or the brain of someone that's done the job longer.Practical experience should build on what the training school taught so that you fill the main mission of every firefighter:to go home at the end of the shift or,for the vollies, after the rig is back at the station and rehabbed for the next call.
    doughesson
    Forum Member
    Last edited by doughesson; 11-13-2006, 12:16 PM.

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  • XRaysJL
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • XRaysJL
    replied
    The real thing

    We've just had the real thing here earlier this week. A campground office building went up in flames. It was closed for the off-season so no one was inside (Thank goodness).

    Minor mistakes were made like driving off in a water truck without unplugging it from the air compressor. It's amazing how much of a "Tunnel-vision" your mind can get. I say "Minor mistakes" because as long as no one got hurt or had their lives in jeopardy, they are minor. Because of the rural location it took some time for all the surrounding departments to get on-scene and so the building could not be saved.

    It's times like that when you say, "Thank goodness I've had some live fire training.".

    Leave a comment:

  • FirefighterRI
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • FirefighterRI
    replied
    I did my level one burn a few weeks back, standard "take your gloves off, feel the layers" type stuff at first. Some of the more advanced guys were doing hose advancement into the burn house and they were readying to do one more when I finished up. Someone asked if any of us probies wanted to act a second line in and my hand shot up. The fire was reported as on bravo charlie corner 2nd floor. We went to bravo charlie 1st floor to check the ceiling/floor (our burn buliding is 2 floors) Well we check the door and felt some heat so we called to charge the line and made entry... we found a fully engulfed room. Put some wet stuff on the red stuff and called it a day. Seems the fire was mis-reported. No big deal really but that day was when I knew for sure that I need to do this for a living and that engine work is for me.
    FirefighterRI
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Last edited by FirefighterRI; 11-11-2006, 01:58 PM.

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  • pipeman3179
    Forum Member

  • pipeman3179
    replied
    bro wait til you get a snotty basement fire. 0% visibility. 100% adrenaline. your bourkes will be melted before you even get to the bottom of the stairs.
    pipeman3179
    Forum Member
    Last edited by pipeman3179; 11-11-2006, 05:01 AM.

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  • fireman4949
    Forum Member

  • fireman4949
    replied
    Originally posted by XRaysJL

    I'd guess that's the time to enjoy the view. Because in a uncontrolled setting (House / structure fire) you'd be too busy getting your job done to enjoy the view.
    Getting the job done does keep you busy, but you ALWAYS enjoy the view!




    Kevin

    Leave a comment:

  • XRaysJL
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • XRaysJL
    replied
    Roll over

    I remember when I was inside a burn and I had fire rolling over, I was alittle worried about shooting too much water up into the ceiling and inverting the thermal layering causing all my collegues to get steam burnt.

    But after a bit I relaxed and enjoyed the view (When I had one to look at).

    I'd guess that's the time to enjoy the view. Because in a uncontrolled setting (House / structure fire) you'd be too busy getting your job done to enjoy the view.

    Leave a comment:

  • enginegirl
    Forum Member

  • enginegirl
    replied
    Hey it's good to see all the enthusiasm here, and yes people will be counting on us for their LIVES. You bet I will be right with my partner, can't see much in there!

    I thought maybe I was crazy to think that fire rolling over the ceiling was beautiful...since it was a live burn I knew it was controlled, in real life we'd be wanting to get that thing put out NOW.

    Leave a comment:

  • XRaysJL
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • XRaysJL
    replied
    Just wait

    You think that was cool, just wait until you go into your first burning building. You'll get to REALLY feel the heat, see the flames rolling over the top of you, get so much smoke that you can't see your buddy who's 24 inches in front of you (You stick out your hand to make sure he\she is still there).

    Yeah, live burns are cool.

    Just remember, when it's real that means someones life is falling apart and they are counting on us.

    Leave a comment:

  • enginegirl
    Forum Member

  • enginegirl
    replied
    live burn

    I had my first live burn three weeks ago and like you I was completely thrilled. It was hot in there and now I really, really trust my equipment. Way too cool to put the fire out. The hardest part was getting the charged hose up the stairs, I was last on the line for that evolution and I was glad I've been working out extra. MUCH too much fun and good to have that under the belt. Keep safe.

    Leave a comment:

  • backsteprescue123
    Forum Member

  • backsteprescue
    replied
    Just last month I went in my first fire, simulated, but fire nonetheless. And I got to wear my dad's N6A so it was one of the best days of my life.

    Leave a comment:

  • firefighter2454
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • firefighter2454
    replied
    Originally posted by fireman4949
    You think that was fun?! It gets better!!!!! You'll probably stroke out when you get some good interior stuff!

    Glad your havin' fun! Study hard and stay safe!




    Kevin

    That was funny.
    Kid it is great to see your enthusiastic about the job. Best of luck to you in the futer be safe and stay low. There is alot more to come we guarentee it.

    Leave a comment:

  • firesideky
    Forum Member

  • firesideky
    replied
    Thanks

    Thank guys i hope i can a good firefighter when i finish college

    Leave a comment:

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