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Difference between a flashover and rollver?

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  • Difference between a flashover and rollver?

    I'm looking for the difference between these too. As im reading up about them I do not completely understand the difference.

    Thanks for the help

  • #2
    A rollover (my def) is when a car rolls over............some people will also say a rollover is when the fire goes acroos the ceiling and in many cases goes behind you and typically this will be a precursor to a flashover....

    "From Wikipedia"..A flashover is the simultaneous ignition of all combustible material in an enclosed area.

    Flashover occurs when the majority of surfaces in a space are heated to the point (known as fire point) at which they give off flammable gases that are hot enough to sustain combustion. Flashover normally occurs at 500 °C (930 °F).

    The classic example of flashover is where a piece of furniture is set alight in a domestic room. The fire on the furniture produces a layer of hot smoke across the ceiling in the room. The radiated heat from this layer causes pyrolysis (heating of the other surfaces in the room, causing them to give off flammable gases). When the surface temperatures become high enough, these gases ignite and, in the space of a few seconds, every surface in the room may be on fire.

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    • #3
      Believe me that was what I was first thinking of a rollover.

      I believe I get what your saying, I'm actually reading it now and it's making more sense with your help.

      Basically a rollover is the fire goes to the top of the cieling because of insufficient amounts of oxygen are availble, causing incomplete combustion. Or the fire goes behind you, causing the temperatures to rise very quickly and is very hard for one to survive. And a flashover occurs when the majority of surfaces in a space are heated to the point at which they give off flammable gases that are hot enough to sustain combustion. Flashover normally occurs at 500.

      I used your definition in there. Do you think I got the difference right? Or am I missing a few key elements? Dont hurt me, I'm new

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      • #4
        A visual explanation is often easier to understand than a written one is.

        Go to this link http://www.firefloor.com/media.htm and click on the "Christmas tree fire" tab...Rollover begins at about 7 seconds. Flashover begins at around 28 seconds.

        Rollover is easily quelled with a short burst of water from a hose line into the ceiling area.
        Flashover is not! It is a true killer.

        I hope this clarifies it a little more for you.



        Kevin
        Fire Lieutenant/E.M.T.
        IAFF Local 2339
        K of C 4th Degree
        "LEATHER FOREVER"
        Member I.A.C.O.J.
        http://www.tfdfire.com/
        "Fir na tine"

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        • #5
          TFD's visual example is perfect. The rollover (or flameover as some textbooks call it) is a normal thing to see and, as stated, easily controlled with a few bursts of water. Flashover is very bad, and NOT something you want to be involved with at all.
          Career Fire Captain
          Volunteer Chief Officer


          Never taking for granted that I'm privileged enough to have the greatest job in the world!

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          • #6
            This is also a good example of what rollover looks like...http://www.firetactics.com/PULSING.htm

            Lots of good info for ya on this site...http://www.firefloor.com/index.htm




            Kevin
            Fire Lieutenant/E.M.T.
            IAFF Local 2339
            K of C 4th Degree
            "LEATHER FOREVER"
            Member I.A.C.O.J.
            http://www.tfdfire.com/
            "Fir na tine"

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            • #7
              I get it now, thank you all for the help your all very kind.

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              • #8
                The guys explained it pretty well....A true flashover is not survivable. It is pretty much the silent killer in our field
                Buck
                Assistant Chief/EMT-B

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                • #9
                  Great post. Flashover is one of the most critical adverse fire reactions we can deal with. I use that christmas tree video in all Firefighter 1 and Firefighter Survival courses I teach to be able to show students what some of the precursors to flashover look like. In many textbooks it will discuss rollover and "snakes" of flame along with the immediate increase in heat, however the "snakes" and rollover are often hidden in the dense, black smoke that is generated during the incipient phase. I was nearly caught in a flashover in 1998, good recognition of changing conditions observed by myself and my partner allowed us to make the decision of retreating and we were only about 10' into the room conducting a primary search in the room that was in front of the fire room. I didn't get to see it light off, but it caught the bottom of my turnout gear and the reflective trim reacted like shrink wrap and the bottom edges singed and turned black. I honestly believe that the double layer of protection of my turnout gear and my bunker boots prevented me from getting any burns and often wondered if I had worn my zip up pro boots if I would have received any at the top of the boots.

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                  • #10
                    Everyone pretty much summed up my ideas on the subject. Good videos too.

                    It is always fun to listen to someone tell a story about how they survived a flashover, yet when you ask them if they have ever been on fire they say no. Classic.
                    Career Firefighter
                    Volunteer Captain

                    -Professional in Either Role-

                    Originally posted by Rescue101
                    I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

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                    • #11
                      Well thanks everyone for the help, as GTR said the information and videos were much more than I asked for. I'll probley have loads more questions hopefully no one minds, first time taking classes with no experience, so I have a lot to learn to keep up with almost everyone in my class haha

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                      • #12
                        I thought rollover is what we do in bed when the pager goes off for a BS medical run for a frequenct flyer at 3am in January?
                        Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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                        • #13
                          going to be a newbie in Baltimore city FD, how can you avoid getting chaugt in a flashover?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DWBCFD40
                            going to be a newbie in Baltimore city FD, how can you avoid getting chaugt in a flashover?

                            I can see it comming now "be a truckie".

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                            • #15
                              HAHA! i feel ya, but i think i'm ready for 2+ years of interior work (after i get off of 4 years on a medic:-)) just trying to get a little heads up before the academy!

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