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Attack line techniques

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  • Attack line techniques

    I'm having a difficult time finding the right technique on holding an 1 3/4 attack line when going interior. We use a combo nozzle set at 110 PSI with no pistol grip so its hard to get the right grip on it. I can bump the GPM down but our department encourages everyone to be proficient to pump at that specific pressure. I'm right handed and have tried holding the bale in one hand and my arm wrapped around the hose. I've switched sides and both are about the same. This technique is about the best that I've tried. I'm not a very big guy as it is and wondering if you could offer me any tips that have helped you other than "man up". All advice will be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    It sounds like you might be holding the nozzle a bit too close to your body. Hold the hose with dominant hand up against your body, with the opposite hand hold the nozzle far enough away from your body but still have complete control of the bail. By having the nozzle tight up against your body, you're absorbing all of the nozzle reaction while trying to control it. Having the nozzle slightly in front it allows the reaction to be focused on your body but the nozzle will be much easier to control. Play around till you find what is the most comfortable.
    Hope this helps.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hey bro what I do is hold the beginning part of the nozzle (just a little past the coupling )with my right hand and extend outward, and with my left hand I hold the hose and pull it to my side to handle the Psi. For me that makes it easy to shut it down by grabbing the handle with my left hand, or if it ever ended up out of control I would be able to just tuck it up under my armpit. Man just be thankful that your department doesn't run it at 155 psi with only one person on the line. Thats what my last Fd done all the time. I would b*tch all the time for them to turn it down or for someone else to jump on the line with me. But some people you will never get them to get out of their old ways.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by sjohannes View Post
        We use a combo nozzle set at 110 PSI
        is this a selectable gallonage nozzle set at 110 gpm? or is that the pump discharge pressure to the hose? or is it how your calculation work out to get 110 at the inlet of the nozzle?

        please specify.
        Originally Posted by madden01
        "and everyone is encouraged to use Plain, Spelled Out English. I thought this was covered in NIMS training."

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        • #5
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jS6iLEzm7jk

          Try google Firefighting Handline techniques or something similar you'll find lots of articles and videos showing different techniques. Try them out and find the one that works for you.

          Comment


          • #6
            Keep your handline low and your nozzle out in front of you. Pin the line to your hip to draw power from your legs instead of keeping the line in some sort of MMA headlock. Your free hand should be able to fully reach out and just touch the nozzle for adjustments. Keeping the nozzle too close to you and too high up will amplify the difficulty in fighting reaction forces.

            Think of it this way, you're basically pushing the nozzle back, when you push against something do you push up high with your arms or keep the weight low and push with your legs? There are many videos online discussing this. Find what works and practice on it till you can't do it wrong.





            Side note, while hose ropes do come in handy sometimes I prefer to not be tied into a line especially if things go wrong quickly.
            ‎"I was always taught..." Four words impacting fire service education in the most negative of ways. -Bill Carey

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            • #7
              Our discharge pressure from the pump is 150 psi. GPM on the nozzle is set at 110. We can adjust it down to 65 PSI if need be, but as I stated before, the department is set on having our nozzle set at 110 at all times. They want it to be the same for everyone across the board.

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              • #8
                BTW thank you to all that responded. I will try and use these techniques and let you know how they work out. Thanks again!

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                • #9
                  I agree with keeping the nozzle out in front of you. Just far enough that you can comfortably reach the tip to adjust if needed. It seems awkward at first but it does help absorb some of that pressure pushing you back. I've also found that working on my hand grip strength helps a bit as well.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Jonny Rotten seems to hit it right on the head. I always find it easy to hold farther back on the line with both hand, but I'm able to reach the bail if need be and let my nozzle do the work. I suggest when you need to have more control is to inch up more on the line.

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                    • #11
                      Hold the nob like you are in love with it and proceed.

                      No sense in trying to make something hard out of a tactic that is simple.
                      Stay Safe and Well Out There....

                      Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CaptOldTimer View Post
                        Hold the nob like you are in love with it and proceed.

                        No sense in trying to make something hard out of a tactic that is simple.
                        Just so I have this correct, you're saying to keep the nozzle close to the body?
                        ‎"I was always taught..." Four words impacting fire service education in the most negative of ways. -Bill Carey

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by sjohannes View Post
                          Our discharge pressure from the pump is 150 psi. GPM on the nozzle is set at 110. We can adjust it down to 65 PSI if need be, but as I stated before, the department is set on having our nozzle set at 110 at all times. They want it to be the same for everyone across the board.
                          You seem to be going between GPM and PSI here. Are you saying your pump pressure is 150, to get your 110 GPM at the nozzle? If so you must be using some terrible hose. Not to mention that is way low for an interior attack line.

                          Here is a good video on all sorts of nozzle handling techniques. Pistol grips belong on the trash lines.

                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzIsAN-V3lA
                          Career Firefighter
                          Volunteer Captain

                          -Professional in Either Role-

                          Originally posted by Rescue101
                          I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tajm611 View Post
                            Just so I have this correct, you're saying to keep the nozzle close to the body?
                            Same thing I was wondering...there's no need to have your hands on the nozzle.
                            Career Fire Captain
                            Volunteer Chief Officer


                            Never taking for granted that I'm privileged enough to have the greatest job in the world!

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                            • #15
                              I still never understood what got pistol grips the fame they have now. The pistol grip is only a safe haven if you've never held hose in a fire attack or you truly enjoy working 50x harder to do the same thing without one. We've removed them from our engine and still mock those who kept them.
                              ‎"I was always taught..." Four words impacting fire service education in the most negative of ways. -Bill Carey

                              Comment

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