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  • Probie

    I just finished Probie school and have been assigned to a station. I feel kinda like a fish outta water walking into to a house with guys that have been on the job for 20 years or so. Just looking for some pointers on what I should be doing around the Station to keep these guys from thinking im a POS.

    thx
    Last edited by Perk84; 02-12-2012, 02:14 AM.

  • #2
    Do you know where all the tools are stored on the apparatus? Do you know how to use them? Do you know your district streets and addresses? Do you know all your department sop's and rules and regulations? These are just some ideas to work on while you say the other guys are sitting around. Make sure you answer the phone. Make sure your officer does not need a hand with a project. Does whoever is doing the cooking need a hand? If you don't know how a tool is used take it out and ask. I am sure they will help.

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    • #3
      Do you not have a probationary firefighter study guide provided by your department and enforced by your company officer??



      Stay Safe and Well Out There....

      Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

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      • #4
        As Chief Lasky would say "You should read something about this job daily". You're on the right track. Feel out the mentors in the group and get under their wing. Ask some of the guys to show you some things or help you out. Rarely will they say no.

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        • #5
          As a probie you should never be just sitting around watching tv. You should be learning your maps, learning your trucks, learning your tools, learning anything and everything you can.

          If you are not on a call or doing chores around the station you should be learning.

          Hope that helps
          Brian Irey

          My comments are mine and mine alone - they do not represent any thoughts or views of my department or anyone else

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          • #6
            You should be working on drills everyday. Take the initiative to redo/practice drill that you went over in recruit school. Do some "saving your own" drills working with knots and so forth. Go out and use some tools. Get to know your district using maps and learning routes.
            Stay busy for the whole year! Don't sit and watch TV all day.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Perk84 View Post
              feels kinda awkward laying around all day with these guys waiting for a call.
              Your Company Officer is faiing you and the Department by allowing this to happen. It is his (and your) reponsibility that you are ready to take on the job by making sure you apply your proby school training through real-life use, either by fireground evaluation or drills. It is also his job to hone your skills and help you to develop your own sense of instinct. I would say approach your Company Officer and ask for drills, but if he is not doing it automatically, I see no use in asking him.
              "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 6Duron1
                Shouldn't you being practicing your Probie drills or making coffee before you check the equipment? The first thing I do when I arrive at the station after putting my gear down is: make fresh coffee, check the water coolers, re-check my trucks.
                I'm hoping checking your SCBA, tools that you're assigned to, and any other equipment assigned to you that day are included in "putting your gear down". If not you might want to check your priorites then. When I started at Dalton I put my gear where I was assigned to ride, checked my SCBA (full check, not just visual), checked the tools I was assigned for the day (e.g. irons, water can, hydrant bag, etc.), and did shift change with the firefighter I was relieving. Then, I would go into the house and put on coffee, clean the kitchen, clean the head (bathroom), and do a general clean-up of the station. Once that was done we had training or work slated for the day so lying around wasn't an issue at Dalton.

                But if there is no "scheduled" work, then work on your training, learn your apparatus, tools, ropes, SOP's/SOG's, and help out with anything needing done around the station. There'll be plenty of time for sitting around later in the evening after all has settled down. Most importantly, have fun, and enjoy the best job in the world.
                Last edited by firefightinirish217; 01-26-2011, 09:17 PM.

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                • #9
                  the obvious that everyone else pointed out is drills; reading FF books; knots. All fine and dandy but who wants to spend all day doing that? I used to pick one small project each tour I worked. Shine the poles, brass on rig; the stationary closet was a mess so I reorganized it; reorganize the tool locker; clean the tools on rig if dirty; ask questions!

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                  • #10
                    I can say this all of what you are doing so far is on the money rookie. Also here is something I have to put in, you should grab something each day an practice with it and regaurdless of how proficeint you feel on it pick one of the crew an ask them to show you something they might think would be a asset. After you have everything down it is important to realize these are the folks who will be at your side holding your back leading you through some of the best and worst times you will ever see. Make them know you want to be one of them. But rember dont be smarmy about it (lol) that could be a bad thing, just be upfront and open with them. NGLB. BHN.
                    LT. Bennett

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 6Duron1
                      Hmm, good idea; we hvae truck days in which we check the SCBAs, but never on an unscheduled day. Good idea, I'll have to run it through everyone's brains.
                      You mean to tell me that nobody on your department checks the SCBA that is in their seat at the beginning of their shift? What, they just hope to God something hasn't gone wrong on it since the last time it was checked? What if the PASS batteries are dead, would be nice to know before you got to a fire.

                      Please, by all means present this idea to them. Your SCBA that you are responsible for on your shift, e.g. the one in the seat you're assigned to, needs to be checked at the beginning of each shift after you lay out your gear and before you do anything else. It could mean your life that day.

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                      • #12
                        Assuming that you are assigned a seat.

                        Here what truck you are on and where you are sitting is situational dependent considering the type of run, location of the run and manpower levels at the station.

                        Not uncommon for in the course of a 9-hour day tour for me to be driving the brush truck, driving the heavy rescue, sitting in the officer's seat of the engine and driving the engine.

                        If I decide to run on a med call add sitting someplace in the light rescue truck.
                        Train to fight the fires you fight.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
                          Assuming that you are assigned a seat.

                          Here what truck you are on and where you are sitting is situational dependent considering the type of run, location of the run and manpower levels at the station.

                          Not uncommon for in the course of a 9-hour day tour for me to be driving the brush truck, driving the heavy rescue, sitting in the officer's seat of the engine and driving the engine.

                          If I decide to run on a med call add sitting someplace in the light rescue truck
                          .
                          So, you can't check the SCBA of whatever seat(s) you might be assigned to? If you get switched to a different apparatus, when you put your gear beside the apparatus, check your crap. If it's a last minute deal, oh well, sucks to be you. Better hope it working. A good idea would be to check any seat assignments you might possibly have that day, I would.

                          Besides that, if you're driving you don't have a SCBA or tools assigned to you, just an apparatus and a pump if it has it.

                          AS for the highlighted text, we're talking about probies here, I doubt they're going to be driving any apparatus, so your point there is moot.

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