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Are second jobs allowed?

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  • DeputyMarshal
    replied
    Originally posted by nmfire View Post
    Actually, no it isn't. Doing something illegal is not grounds for discipline at work unless your labor contract or employers rules say so. So it does need to be documented as something that can be held against you at work.
    Doing something illegal shouldn't be grounds for discipline at work unless it explicitly carries over to work. In which case, having done it off duty is irrelevant.

    Most public safety agencies DO have such clauses in their employment agreement / contract / handbook / whatever.
    Usually limited to felonies and one need not to commit a felony on duty to become a felon all the time. So it's not really necessary to regulate the criminal activity; just criminal status.

    If you get arrested for dealing crack or DUI or beating up a police officer in a drunken stupor, you might as well not bother coming to work the next day.
    Actually, you'd better. Otherwise you'd be AWOL and getting arrested isn't grounds for seperation anywhere.

    We're all in positions of trust and people's lives can depend on us. So abiding by the law has to be something our employers can hold us to.
    Being in a position of trust doesn't mean we give up our rights but that's a whole seperate discussion.

    Showing up to work ready and able to safely perform your job is a requirement of the job and the responsibility of the individual to handle.
    Agreed.

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  • nmfire
    replied
    Originally posted by DeputyMarshal View Post
    If it's already illegal, putting a prohibition against it in a labor contract is redundant.
    Actually, no it isn't. Doing something illegal is not grounds for discipline at work unless your labor contract or employers rules say so. So it does need to be documented as something that can be held against you at work.

    For example, it is unlikely that McDonald's has it in their employment agreement that one can be terminated, suspended, or otherwise disciplined at work for getting arrested "off duty" for smoking week or DUI. You could come in and tell your boss "yah man I was sooooo high and I ran over a kid. My bumper is all bent now. Oh **** man, the fries just dinged so I gotta go get back to work."

    Most public safety agencies DO have such clauses in their employment agreement / contract / handbook / whatever. If you get arrested for dealing crack or DUI or beating up a police officer in a drunken stupor, you might as well not bother coming to work the next day.

    This is taking things that are already illegal that we should hold ourselves above. We're all in positions of trust and people's lives can depend on us. So abiding by the law has to be something our employers can hold us to.

    Building decks on the side has nothing to do with trust, integrity, reliability, and professional standards. Neither does going for a hike on the weekends. Neither does volunteering for a [non-competing] other department. Neither does mowing your lawn. So none of these things should regulated by your employer.

    Showing up to work ready and able to safely perform your job is a requirement of the job and the responsibility of the individual to handle. If the individual screws that up, that individual should be dealt with accordingly. There is now reason to stop everyone else from buildings decks or kayaking when everyone else can sleep and come to work ready and able.

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  • OHFirestopper
    replied
    We all got into this profession knowing we weren't gonna get rich and unfortunately some people have to work second jobs to get by, other work them to keep busy and to make some extra cash. I know a lot of people with second jobs, whether it be on an another part time department, ambulance company, construction jobs, or even own there own business. A few are even nurses working full time as an RN and Firefighter, yes it's a lot of work but they still come in on time and perform just as well working two jobs. If it every interfered with their full time fire job than it would be a problem but as if it doesn't my department doesn't care where and how much you work on the side.

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  • DeputyMarshal
    replied
    Originally posted by nmfire View Post
    Well, there's some things that are appropriate to say you can't do off-duty. Like crack.
    If it's already illegal, putting a prohibition against it in a labor contract is redundant.

    But to regulate side jobs, volunteering, recreation, etc is ridiculous. If someone shows up for work in a condition that inhibits them, or they don't show up at all, that person should be dealt with appropriately.
    Agreed. Your job rules should be about showing up when you're supposed to and what you do once you're there; not what you do on your own time.

    Regulate what is require on duty and it will sort out the retards.
    Bingo!

    Leave a comment:


  • nmfire
    replied
    Well, there's some things that are appropriate to say you can't do off-duty. Like crack. But to regulate side jobs, volunteering, recreation, etc is ridiculous. If someone shows up for work in a condition that inhibits them, or they don't show up at all, that person should be dealt with appropriately. Does it matter why they showed up to work too tired or too hung over? Don't regulate the things that may or may not effect you. Regulate what is require on duty and it will sort out the retards.

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  • DeputyMarshal
    replied
    For those states where contracts have any standing, it's all subject to negotiation.

    Personally, I think anyone who negotiates a contract that places restrictions on what they are allowed to do while they're off duty is out of their ever loving mind.
    Last edited by DeputyMarshal; 04-21-2011, 06:30 PM. Reason: typo

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  • CaptOldTimer
    replied
    At one time you could not be a taxi driver or anything that would affect your job as a firefighter.

    Plus you couldn't work past 2200 hours, so you could get proper rest before you reported for duty the following morning.

    Probies can't work until they have completed their probation, unless it is a dire necessity

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  • BoxAlarm187
    replied
    We're limited to working no more than 30 hours per week in a part-time job, but no specific restrictions on when those hours are, etc. Our rules basically say that the member must arrive groomed, rested, and prepared for duty. This covers a lot of bases, including a member who decided to stay out with friends until 3AM and then report for duty at 7AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • SMOKEEATERFF
    replied
    No no really. Your fire dept. job is your main priority as far as work. Show up when you are scheduled to and there isn't really any problems. We are on the 24/48 schedule so it gives you plenty of time off. Some guys work at the ambulance the day they get off from the firehouse and pull a 24. It works for us.

    Leave a comment:


  • JT_Fire_2000
    started a topic Are second jobs allowed?

    Are second jobs allowed?

    I am just curious if there are departments out there that put some type of restriction on firefighter's second jobs etc. This has been a hot topic in our department lately as one of our members also works for the local ambulance company. He works 12pm to 12am then comes into work at 7am. An incident occurred and the genius used the excuse that "he was too tired from his other job". So long story short now our department is looking at this issue. This issues is one huge mess, but it prompted me to ask here. Do any of you work for departments that have any type of policy on second jobs etc?

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