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  • Show a little Respect.

    I just like everyone else on this forum is either an aspiring Firefighter or already has the career they had dreamed of in the fire service. This is very simple, and honestly its very disrespectful of people to do it and I bet a good 3/4's of you still do it to this day while testing. Just a little word of advise, show up to a written orientation or test in something professional, like slacks and a button up shirt. Not NYFD Rescue 1, or all I wanna be is a Firefighter. It's very decieving seeing people come into test wearing their company FD shirts or other FD shirts. Hell even seeing at MOCO MD's test you people wearing your Minitor pagers to a test. come on now really. What you going to stand up in the middle of the test for a reported barn on fire and respond up 270 to make up staffing...REALLY COME ON...It honestly shows, who really wants the job and whose there to keep trying. Even at PGFD CPAT mentor sessions, wearing your dress dickies, and a PGFD uniform Tshirt. seriously. Yes I'm from Maryland and yes I am trying to get hired, and in all honesty i'm just trying to inform people trying to get hired and coming to testing processes in FD shirts, your dickies, or station boots, full beards, are not going to get you far in a process. And for the first time going through a process in Baltimore County people were even told you wear some FD shirt you will be removed from the process. Sure enough a dozen people showed up and guess what they were removed from the whole process. I hope this trend keeps up with all departments.

    Just Some advice. Good Luck and see you in a future academy hopefully!

  • #2
    Obviously you have never sat for a civil service exam in a large city. Philadelphia traditionally picks the hottest days of the year for theirs, and gives the test in a non-air conditioned high school, which is usually filled to the max with 3000 guys at a time. You are crammed into rooms filled to capacity, and are forced to sit in those god-awful chairs with the desk thing attached. The room is usually no less than 96 degrees, and you are already pouring sweat due to being nervous. The test is given by teachers, who are working for the Department of Personnel on overtime. They could care less what you are wearing. There is not a Fire Department representative anywhere in sight, in fact the Fire Department has absolutely no say whatsoever in anything until you are selected by the Dept of Personnel and are tendered a job offer. The Department of Personnel authorities that are present could care less who you are or what you are wearing, as long as you take the written exam according to their rules and regulations.

    So, all that being said, would you rather wear pants with a shirt and tie, or a pair of decent shorts and a comfortable shirt? (and I will concede to the wacker shirts being worn as tacky.)

    Moral of the story, Some places you really don't have to look good until later in the game.
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

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    • #3
      I gotta agree with fillthebox on this one. I have been testing in major cities this year and you see the same group of ******* at each one...
      1) Volunteer guy. I think they want to repel in off the ceiling or something. I have been at tests where these guys are told to turn off monitors. Really?

      2) Suit and tie. This is better, more formal, but today is not the interview. Suit tie usually is sitting firmly upright at the desk when the HR secretary's cousin hands him the test pack.

      3) MMA guy. This is a new one. Usually has on TAPOUT shirt, one size too small.

      4) Overly casual. Flip-flops, ripped shirt, cargo jeans , and bud light hat. Ok, it's still a job process.

      5) Cleavage girl (recently saw in Nashville) The girl that shirt is about to explode off and looks like she is going to the bar after. I'm ok with this, I swear, but not at a job testing.

      I agree with above, a nice pair of khakis or dark pants, even clean jeans, and a collared shirt. At least respect the people you are testing for.

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      • #4
        I agree with big leagues. Don't come in like you're going to the lake after the test. But dress in a way both professional and comfortable. I did nice jeans and a polo or button-up shirt (being in TX, btw, jeans aren't frowned upon as much).

        But as both a volunteer and a career FF testing - Don't show up wearing anything FD/EMS related. Your current department, the department you're testing for, uniform, cheesy T-shirts.... you get the idea.

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        • #5
          pssss.....its FDNY.
          Proud East Coast Traditionalist.

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          • #6
            Hahahaha....yeah, that's funny. I especially like the point about the "MMA guy in a TAPOUT t-shirt". What bafoons.

            I guess it's a mental game. Like they're hoping that by LOOKING like they're already on a FD or looking like they're super-tough, it will "psych" out the other test takers and increase their odds at being hired.

            We've had the same guys test with our city. I'm glad they came out and tested, but it's really tacky when they look like SWAT-wannabes or MMA drop-outs.

            I remember when I tested with Houston and the city I currently work for. I wore a pair of tan "dockers" and a polo shirt. I got a few "weird" looks, but I didn't care. I was there to test and make as good an impression as possible. I guess it worked.

            Great thread. HAhahahaha

            Pete
            Last edited by sweetpete; 11-17-2010, 10:56 PM.

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            • #7
              wow, i always love when this topic bubbles back up to the top.

              If you are in a room with 500 - 1500 people and the test is being administered by people that are involved with the city, and not the fire department, who cares what you wear?

              Sure you look like a ****** when you show up in you 'Big Dawg Fire' shirt, but who gives a daym. Show up and ace the test and don't worry about what other people are wearing.
              In that situation i'd wear something that is appropriate for the season/weather. No way in hell am I going to wear a shirt and tie when testing for a city like PHX in the summer. That's crazy talk.

              There are exceptions however. If you are applying for a small town department, i'd consider wearing something a little more formal. If there are less than 50 people testing for a position, you'd stand out more (although in that type of environment more than likely those hiring you have an opinion of you or your family before you even test)

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              • #8
                My 2 cents:

                In South Florida, one of the hardest places to get hired, I would show up in suit just to turn in my application. Every test, I would wear a suit. Summer tests with 100% humidity, suit. Room with 8000 people in it, suit. Only physical tests I would wear physical clothes, but regardless of who is giving the test, it just shows you want the job. I can count the numerous times I showed up to a test and halfway through a big chief would walk in and make comments to the guys in shorts and flip flops, or even point them out to the room.

                I guess i'm crazy, but its why i'm on da job today and a lot of my friends are now going to nursing school

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                • #9
                  My opinion on the matter is middle ground. I definetely don't have anything wrong with wearing a suit for whatever you want excluding the PAT, and I definetely think it is rediculous to show in flip flops and cut offs for anything as well, but there is a lot more they look at and I think clothes is down towards the bottom of the list of things. If you have an interview then yes wear a suit, if you are in a large room for a test then dress more casual and comfortable and their are not going to note what every person is wearing. Most of the processes I have been through look more at scores, times, answers, experience, certificates, and yes even background (racial and sexual orientation) so in my experience put more effort into those categories that you can and worry less about clothes during testing. Then again better to overdress than under.

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                  • #10
                    My view is to each their own. I personally am one of the people who dress up in nice casual for every part of the process, other than the physical as stated previously. Yes it's a big joke seeing all the applicants dress up in their "insert-name here" fire department apparell, and even worse when they bring their pagers in. They should automatically not be allowed to test. I understand the arguments concerning it's a civil service exam and there are no fire department personal in the building, but you are applying for a professional position. Dress to impress! Overall why even let it bother you how others are dressed though?

                    P.S. All the people arguing about it being "too hot" or "humid" for a suit or button down shirt, get real. Did you know part of the job is to wear 50+ lbs. of PPE in those same temperatures and even in addition to go into a confined room full of fire where temperatures exceed the outside 100 degree weather. On top of that your supposed to perform to the best of your ability!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Tests

                      Of the test I have seen,participated in or heard of.....there is always a fire presence at the written exam. There were eyes on the candidates from picking up the application , written, physical agility and orals.....trust me when I say this that there is grading going on even if you think there isn't. I will also say that there are others who hire out to run their exam and I have not seen that so be careful and make sure you dress as you think it needs to be .
                      Respectfully,
                      Jay Dudley
                      Retired Fire
                      Background Investigator
                      IACOJ-Member
                      Lifetime Member CSFA
                      IAFF Alumni Member

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