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wearing double hoods

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  • jccrabby3084
    replied
    Originally posted by THEFIRENUT View Post
    I always thought that "EVERYTHING" burned up in a Flashover!!!!!
    First I'm really surprised how long this thread has been going on.

    Anyway...as for the quote part....that is why we wear this gear. It can and will protect you in a flashover. If I do recall there were 5 FF's from Kansas City make it out of a flashover. Hope all are doing good.

    Second we had a LODD this past summer and one of our FF's was able to get out. Her gear was something else to see the pics of. Helmet held up, but faceshield was melted. The gear was discolored and the mgf stated that was actually burned, but it held up. When our other FF was finally recovered, the boots were melted and SCBA fiberglass on the tank was opened, but the gear held up. It was estimated that the fire was close to 2000 degrees and at a point a there was a freon tank in the basement that the relief valve blew and was like a blowtorch over the head of the FF who got out.

    Point being folks...this gear is there for a reason and does work if it is properly worn.

    Leave a comment:


  • jerry4184
    replied
    What kind of gear do you have that makes it in a flashover? Mine sure as heck won't take a flashover UNSCATHED! I don't know of any gear short of proximity stuff that can take those temperatures at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • giweff
    replied
    The room was on fire top to bottom We were lucky to get out not hurt and part of the reason was we had our hoods on. All of our face maskes were melted out and they would not have lasted too much longer. Who ever said that everything is on fire in a flashover you should know our gear is designed to make is a short amout of time in a flashover. That is why i am able to write this today.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnny46
    replied
    Originally posted by clermontfd623 View Post
    this is the first i've heard of double hoods i really dont like it all you need is one by the time 2 hoods would be effective you would be toast some of the real old school guys on my department dont like to wear hoods at all not sure if this is true but i heard one guy tough as nails got burns all over his head from this practice
    Two hoods or not, the weakest part of the ensemble is the mask.

    Two hoods would be weaker than one coat.

    Firefighters WITHOUT hoods have been caught in flashovers or burned and killed.

    It's a myth that needs to be executed, pushed into a deep, deep grave, covered with lime, concrete, hardened steel and left unmarked, lest someone resurrect this stupidest of fairytales.

    Leave a comment:


  • THEFIRENUT
    replied
    Originally posted by giweff View Post
    I Was in a flashover last year and I only had one hood on. Out helmets maskes and straps on out scba's burnt but not my ears or any where else for that matter. There is no need for two. But I think you are Stupid if you dont wear one at all. I can take some heat but why in the hell would anyone not want to wear something that is going to help them not get hurt.
    I always thought that "EVERYTHING" burned up in a Flashover!!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • giweff
    replied
    I Was in a flashover last year and I only had one hood on. Out helmets maskes and straps on out scba's burnt but not my ears or any where else for that matter. There is no need for two. But I think you are Stupid if you dont wear one at all. I can take some heat but why in the hell would anyone not want to wear something that is going to help them not get hurt.

    Leave a comment:


  • ndvfdff33
    replied
    Originally posted by 1835Wayne View Post
    Punctuation and grammar please young man. This is not Myspace,Yahoo,or MSN messenger.
    Theres no such thing anymore

    Leave a comment:


  • t0asty
    replied
    I feel stupid. I read that whole post in one breath thinking their would be punctuation.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1835Wayne
    replied
    Punctuation and grammar please young man. This is not Myspace,Yahoo,or MSN messenger.

    Leave a comment:


  • clermontfd623
    replied
    this is the first i've heard of double hoods i really dont like it all you need is one by the time 2 hoods would be effective you would be toast some of the real old school guys on my department dont like to wear hoods at all not sure if this is true but i heard one guy tough as nails got burns all over his head from this practice

    Leave a comment:


  • MichaelD77
    replied
    It seems to me like they would sell hoods in pairs if you were supposed to wear two.

    Leave a comment:


  • fireman4949
    replied
    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
    Ok, I should have been more clear. Those two instances are not what I was referring to. A "safe training enviorment" in my perspective is a burn building, the type of a building that is built for training burns and that alone. The building itself cannot catch fire, therefore conditions are much more controllable. Burning in a building that has been set aside to burn becuase it isnt good for anything else is an entirely different story.

    Even then, only the instructors would be the ones to wear double hoods, mostly for preference. They are exposed to the heat longer than we the firefighters who go through one or twice and are sometimes closer to the fire itself.
    Thanks for clarifying that.

    I guess I am one of those instructors that your referring to. Sometimes I may spend as much a 40 minutes, or more inside at a single stretch. Lighting and tending the fire until optimum interior temperatures (as indicated by fixed thermocouples and a TIC) are reached, and then staying in as an interior safety officer during an evolution. I still don't advocate wearing 2 hoods.
    And as I stated above, I don't even like to use helmet flaps. I can feel some heat, but I have yet to be burned through my hood. I have been blistered a little on rare occasion if there is a gap around the mask, but that's my fault for, not the hood's.




    Kevin

    Leave a comment:


  • GTRider245
    replied
    Ok, I should have been more clear. Those two instances are not what I was referring to. A "safe training enviorment" in my perspective is a burn building, the type of a building that is built for training burns and that alone. The building itself cannot catch fire, therefore conditions are much more controllable. Burning in a building that has been set aside to burn becuase it isnt good for anything else is an entirely different story.

    Even then, only the instructors would be the ones to wear double hoods, mostly for preference. They are exposed to the heat longer than we the firefighters who go through one or twice and are sometimes closer to the fire itself.

    Leave a comment:


  • FyredUp
    replied
    I am a guy who has been around since hoods first came into the fire service. The first hoods were white single layer Nomex and we thought they were the best thing since sliced bread. They eliminated those painful neck and forehead burns around the mask. But they weren't perfect, they were very thin and stretched out of shape very easily. Soon other materials came on the scene, PBI, Kevlar, P-84 Lenzing, carbon fibers and blends.

    My favorite is a 2 layer P-84 Lenzing. It has offered me great protection and is durbale and comfortable.

    Where your hood and keep your ears and more protected. It is really that simple.

    FyredUp

    Leave a comment:


  • Slaytallica45
    replied
    Originally posted by WVfire12 View Post
    I can barely stand wearing one hood. I can't imagine using 2...

    What exactly is so "unbearable" about wearing a hood?

    Leave a comment:

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