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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    like i said guys, im sorry for all you out there that are volunteers, as in, i sorry i said this. I was only expressing my opinion w/o thinking

    Really? I never could have guessed
    Last edited by 35monroeffemt; 02-15-2007, 02:16 AM.

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  • alpha4
    replied
    what i said i didnt mean to offend anyone, so i am sorry if i did, i wasnt think at the time

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  • tbonetrexler
    replied
    Originally posted by alpha4 View Post
    i really think that there should be no VFD's out there. im sorry for all you out there that are Volunteers, but i think that the response time to get to the station, suit up, and go to the scene of a fire is a lot. There should be quicker response times, to save peoples lives
    This seems like something johnboycan would say. (did i remember the right troll? lol)

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  • backsteprescue
    replied
    One of the best know rescue squads in the world runs as volunteer with absolutely NO TAX MONEY. They are well known and well respected throughout the world.


    The Bethesda Chevy Chase Rescue Squad, Bethesda, MD.

    They run 2 Heavy Rescue Squads, 3 ALS Ambulances, 4 BLS Ambulances, 2 Chief's cars, 2 utility vehicles, 1 Air Wagon, and 1 cascade trailer.

    They also have a $1.4 million annual budget.

    Check it out for yourself at www.bccrs.org

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  • Chazz2771
    replied
    I think there's something to be said about a guy who is willing to wake up out of a sound sleep at 3:00 in the morning, drive to the station using his own vehicle and gas, and spend half the night putting a fire out in someone's home, cutting someone out of a car, or even just finding a CO leak or resetting an alarm. And went it's all said and done getting a few bucks for gas (if ur lucky enough) and maybe a thank you.


    Just my two pennies (not knocking career guys and not talkin up vollies)

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  • doughesson
    replied
    Just because SOME vollie departments are slow doesn't mean that all of them are.On my old department,we were always reminded of the NFPA reg about response times.We might not have gotten there to save more that the foundation but we NEVER lost a resident to fire while I was on that department.In school visits and station tours,we emphasized how we'd like to see people in their pjs standing by the mailbox when we rolled up on a fire and that advice took.
    Not all volunteer departments get tax funds from their county to run.Some have to nearly cross the line into armed robbery(don't get any ideas)to buy gear that they need to go home to their own families after a difficult call.
    How do you think a paid department could have gotten to that fire in Bardstown,Ky any quicker?From what I've read in the paper,the place was fully involved as the dispatch was going out.
    People who volunteer take time away from their family and their jobs to protect their neighbors from harm.We train once or twice a week,maybe twice a month but that doesn't mean that volunteers are less skilled, or motivated to get to where they can"put the blue stuff on the red stuff".

    Originally posted by alpha4 View Post
    like i said guys, im sorry for all you out there that are volunteers, as in, i sorry i said this. I was only expressing my opinion w/o thinking about the funding involved to run w/o volunteers. i wrote that post after i read about the 10 people who died after a house fire, and the VFD response was questioned.

    http://cms.firehouse.com/content/art...Id=46&id=53445

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  • Eng34FF
    replied
    Originally posted by alpha4 View Post
    like i said guys, im sorry for all you out there that are volunteers, as in, i sorry i said this. I was only expressing my opinion w/o thinking about the funding involved to run w/o volunteers. i wrote that post after i read about the 10 people who died after a house fire, and the VFD response was questioned.

    http://cms.firehouse.com/content/art...Id=46&id=53445
    I understand the knee-jerk reaction, but keep in mind that there are cases of paid services not being able to respond in a timely manner as well. Granted these are almost all in large cities and mostly EMS related. The issue is call volume and the number of units available, but just being paid doesn't guarantee rapid service. This is not a criticism of career firefighters, just a fact of life. There are also areas where the distance from a station to the address precludes a rapid response.

    Bottom line is that there is a place for both, and both systems can work.

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  • jeeten1049
    replied
    Originally posted by alpha4 View Post
    like i said guys, im sorry for all you out there that are volunteers, as in, i sorry i said this. I was only expressing my opinion w/o thinking about the funding involved to run w/o volunteers. i wrote that post after i read about the 10 people who died after a house fire, and the VFD response was questioned.

    http://cms.firehouse.com/content/art...Id=46&id=53445
    This does happen too many times to cite. People do see red and fire off a reply or start a thread. In this great country of ours, there are many times more Volunteers than Paid Personnel. Yes, in an ideal world, there might not be a need for Volunteers. However, the Volunteer brings the community fiber to the Fire Service. I have seen, numerous times, paid departments, due to recruiting requirements, the personnel hired have no ties to the communities, therefore are more along the lines of mercenaries. When I was in New York in 2002, I noticed a mixture of both, civic fiber and mercenaries. We as a group need to keep the communities we serve in the front of our minds and do the best we can to serve them; be it by Paid, Part paid, or Volunteer Members. We have a common goal we need to keep in our hearts and mind.

    Leave a comment:


  • rhvfd1214
    replied
    One of the first things I realized after volunteering was how limited we were in the things we could do. It was a great wake-up call. I guess everyone wants to be somebody's hero, however, I know I am limited to the training and experience that I have. The department's response is limited to the equipment we have. It isn't ideal by any means, but we serve a purpose. Sometimes it may be just a sense of comfort to victims of tragedy, knowing that people are willing to come help. Sometimes we do get to make a difference and have a major impact on saving someone's life or property. We may not be the best at all fireground operations, but we train, we learn, and we do provide a service. Safety is always a concern, as it should be with every person in public service, volunteer or career.

    Leave a comment:


  • alpha4
    replied
    Originally posted by alpha4 View Post
    i really think that there should be no VFD's out there. im sorry for all you out there that are Volunteers, but i think that the response time to get to the station, suit up, and go to the scene of a fire is a lot. There should be quicker response times, to save peoples lives
    like i said guys, im sorry for all you out there that are volunteers, as in, i sorry i said this. I was only expressing my opinion w/o thinking about the funding involved to run w/o volunteers. i wrote that post after i read about the 10 people who died after a house fire, and the VFD response was questioned.

    http://cms.firehouse.com/content/art...Id=46&id=53445

    Leave a comment:


  • Junclejoe
    replied
    Volunteers

    Originally posted by alpha4 View Post
    I don't know where else to post this so,

    The FD here is all career, so i have no idea how Volunteer fire dept.'s work. I know that they are given pagers, so is it who ever makes it to the station the fastest, and gets on the trucks that go on the calls? or is it like shift days. And do they spend the night at the station? or get paged out in the middle of the night to run calls. Can someone please explain., Thx

    O yea, and what does the first person at the station do and stuff.
    I am a volunteer in a combination department. We are toned out at the same time the career side is, no matter what time of day or night. We pull duty and train with the career side and it works out good for us.

    Leave a comment:


  • bobsnyder
    replied
    Originally posted by alpha4
    i really think that there should be no VFD's out there. im sorry for all you out there that are Volunteers, but i think that the response time to get to the station, suit up, and go to the scene of a fire is a lot. There should be quicker response times, to save peoples lives
    [Takes off his "captain" helmet and puts on his "economnist" cap...]

    This is a classic example of a optimal public good provision problem. The question at hand is "what level of resources should our county/town/township/etc. dedicate to fire protection?" The choices run the gammut from "nothing" (in which case you end up with an all-volunteer fire department with whatever funding they can scrape together themselves coming from wherever they happen to be, if you have any protection at all) all the way up to "whatever it takes to have all the help necessary on scene within a few minutes" (in which case, you need a huge commitment in paid peresonnel, apparatus, building, etc. to make that happen).

    In the real world, communities usually choose something in between, investing the level of resources needed to obtain what the citizens feel to be an acceptable level of coverage, subject to their own budget constraints. If the community feels they need more/faster/better coverage, they'll choose to pay for it. If they don't, they won't get it. In some communities, paid 24x7 coverage is simply impossible...they can't afford it. In others, it's possible but the community is happy with something else (volunteers with some municipal funding, combo departments, etc.), and in still others, they pay for a high level of 24x7 coverage.

    My point in all of this is that there is no "correct" level of coverage or "right" answer to this question of levels of coverage. Different levels are optimal for different communities, given their needs and budget constraints.

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  • rhvfd1214
    replied
    If we didn't volunteer in our area, fires would burn uncontrolled, people would be tangled in wrecks, and general havoc would be the norm. I volunteered because I could see the need for someone to help. If nobody volunteered, then nobody would come to help. Sometimes it is a matter of community service and pride. Paid departments sound great, but if the funding isn't there, the job still needs to be done.

    Leave a comment:


  • dmleblanc
    replied
    Originally posted by randsc View Post
    Why start a thread with questions about the volunteer fire service if you don't think such a thing should exist?

    .

    That's kind of what I was thinking....

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  • dmleblanc
    replied
    Originally posted by alpha4 View Post
    i really think that there should be no VFD's out there. im sorry for all you out there that are Volunteers, but i think that the response time to get to the station, suit up, and go to the scene of a fire is a lot. There should be quicker response times, to save peoples lives
    That's a pretty bold statement to be making (not that it hasn't been made here before). It's good for you that in your area they have the funds and the community support for a paid department, but it doesn't work that way everywhere.

    Incoming, everybody duck.....

    Leave a comment:

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