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  • pompiermeeks
    replied
    Exploring and those of power

    I started this post in 1993. I had only 7 years on the department when I approached the Director Chief to support my starting a Post.
    I had a High Adventure Post for over 10 years and delt with many issues when it came to who was in charge.
    I thought being new on the department there might be issues. I chose to address the problems of youth and adult as I had in the past, strong By-Laws and Rules and Regulations.
    The only issues that have been pushed were dealing with 'Ride Along's '.
    It was handeled by following the policies and procedures as adopted by the Post and agreed to by each member and their parents. Members followed the rules of left the post.
    I enjoy working with youth and knew that starting a program where I work would create issues that would have to be addressed. So far all the issues have been resolved without incident.
    The By-Laws outlines my authority and obligation to the Post, I have the final say over issues pertaining to the Post. Post By-Laws outline youth members and their parents specific responsibilitie.
    Enjoy Scouting.
    Michael




    QUOTE=summermist21FD;753513]not sure weather or not this has been a specific post or not.
    but have any of you ever dealt when a parent or gaurdian is a high ranking officer, and a son/daughter/whatever is a junior/explorer/cadet to where they begin to step all over you, just because of who there parent/legal gaurdian is? if so, how did you deal with it.. if not, how would you deal with it..





    FIRE SCHOOL STARS NEXT MONTH FOR ME!!
    YAYYYYY




    stay safe and godbless all.[/QUOTE]

    Leave a comment:


  • SWAGGY
    replied
    Special Treatment

    I Was An Explorer And My Father Is A Batt. Chief And With His Company For Over 25 Years. When It Came To Special Treatment I Got The Bad Kind From The Explorers(ie: More Pt Harder Testing Longer Waits For Gear) But When I Was At The Station I Was Treated Like An Employee. I Had To Get Up Everyday And Do The Assigned Chores, Run With The Crew All Night, Wash Trucks, Roll Hose, Clean Hose, Mainly The Station Work Horse. I Was Teased About Being The Chiefs Son More Than Being Treated Any Diffrent, I Had To Earn My Reputation Which Is That Work Horse, And Now I Am A Dispatcher Working For The Same Company That My Dad Does, But I Still Have That Reputation That I Earned When I Was An Explorer.

    So My Advice Is To Work Your *** Off And Learn Everything That You Can But Not To Be A Know It All. You Dont Know **** Until You Have Been In A Fire And Taken The Same Classes And Done All The Work That Firefighter Or Explorers Have Done To Get Where They Are.

    Leave a comment:


  • FireDemon618
    replied
    Hey

    MY father is the post advisor in Groveland and I was "elected" lieutenant there by the cadets not the advisors because prior to that i used to ride with the department not as a "volunteer" but just as a man riding on the trucks.....I had gained alot of expireience from that time but never used my father as anything I earned everything I've got,

    Now I'm with a different post and about to test for battalion chief which I've earned and my father had nothing to do with so after saying that,

    If they are doing that then they are ignorant and I have no respect for them just ignore them and do your best and all will be fine.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mihlrad
    replied
    My lt. and his brother's father is an ex-chief, during the time the father was chief, he suspended both of them, they treated him as a chief at the firehouse and he treated them no different then anyone else. Thats how it should be. And right now, the older of the 2 is the Lt. he treats his brother the same as everyone.

    If someone is clearly acting superior due to a family member, talk to the family member who is high in rank. A high ranking man should know better then to allow that to happen.

    Leave a comment:


  • summermist21FD
    replied
    Originally posted by the1141man View Post
    That's about the only kind I'm good for... I don't play politics, nor do I brook much BS. My personal opinion is that politics shouldn't have a place in the firehouse, save for occasionally buttering up some legislator for more $$.

    Sorry I don't have anything more "useful" to the situation, Summer, but the fact is that if the chief knows and lets the kid get away with it, there's really little you can do to remedy the situation, especially within the confines of "politically correct".
    hahaha,
    it's all good.
    thanks much.
    stay safe.

    Leave a comment:


  • the1141man
    replied
    the1141man -- good non-politically correct advice....
    That's about the only kind I'm good for... I don't play politics, nor do I brook much BS. My personal opinion is that politics shouldn't have a place in the firehouse, save for occasionally buttering up some legislator for more $$.

    Sorry I don't have anything more "useful" to the situation, Summer, but the fact is that if the chief knows and lets the kid get away with it, there's really little you can do to remedy the situation, especially within the confines of "politically correct".

    Leave a comment:


  • FLexplorer305
    replied
    special treatment

    The only thing i can tell you is that explorers that are related to Firefighters, think that they shouldnt get special treatment. But I certainly believe that if your gonna have special treatment for one you should have it for all, for example the old Lt. we had at my post made Lt. because he was related to a firefighter. He had bunker gear before all of the explorers and he was allowed to do much more things than other explorers. Also we had a problem because he thought he was a firefighter. He always argued with the other advisers and he never listened to them when they told him to do things. When the other advisors told us to wash the truck , and clean the station, he never did any of the assigned jobs. So I believe "Special Treatment for one, Special Treatment for all".

    GodBless,
    Stay safe

    Leave a comment:


  • AustinFink
    replied
    I am the son of a Lt. and personally I think that it puts more pressure on me to be better. I think the only reason I might get "special treatment" is because mostly the "old timers" know that I know my stuff. My advice to you is to study up on your materials and show your higher ranking officers that you know what you are doing.

    Leave a comment:


  • summermist21FD
    replied
    Originally posted by CPMiller View Post
    the1141man -- good non-politically correct advice and urban legend.

    summermist21fd -- I have a similar stituation. Without going into the long story and all the details - My only fellow Junior is the Assistant Chief's son, the Chief's nephew, and a career firefighter's step-son. Even though I am older, have more experience, been on the department longer, and have more certifications, hence more rank; he is allowed to do more than I. How do I deal with it? I hold my head high, smile, and keep my mouth shut. When I am told to sweep the bay or wash windows; while he gets to work with the extrication equipment (technically he doesn't have enough rank to do this) I do it without complaint. It can be hard at times, but showing I am willing to help wherever needed is slowly paying off. Don't give up, and if you want to talk to someone who has been there doing that feel free to PM me. Congrats on starting fire school! Stay safe.


    CPMiller - thanks much for the advice
    I really apprechiate it.
    It's great to know that i'm not the only one, who gets somewhat distracted from this subject.
    I will probally end up Messaging you about something lol.
    But once again thanks much
    Stay Safe as well!

    Leave a comment:


  • CPMiller
    replied
    the1141man -- good non-politically correct advice and urban legend.

    summermist21fd -- I have a similar stituation. Without going into the long story and all the details - My only fellow Junior is the Assistant Chief's son, the Chief's nephew, and a career firefighter's step-son. Even though I am older, have more experience, been on the department longer, and have more certifications, hence more rank; he is allowed to do more than I. How do I deal with it? I hold my head high, smile, and keep my mouth shut. When I am told to sweep the bay or wash windows; while he gets to work with the extrication equipment (technically he doesn't have enough rank to do this) I do it without complaint. It can be hard at times, but showing I am willing to help wherever needed is slowly paying off. Don't give up, and if you want to talk to someone who has been there doing that feel free to PM me. Congrats on starting fire school! Stay safe.

    Leave a comment:


  • summermist21FD
    replied
    Originally posted by the1141man View Post
    Ohhhh...a politically correct way...important thing to specify, there.

    Let's see...politically correct way....

    Oh, yeah: Quit. Find another department.

    That's about the only "politically correct" way to handle it.

    The reason I say this is because if the son/daughter was mature, they wouldn't be throwing their "weight" around. If the chief officer parent was mature and caught wind of their kid pulling crap, they'd step on them so hard they'd be defecating vital organs for a week.
    Beings as a good chief/line officer knows all that goes on in their Company/station, the parent probably has some idea of what their kid is doing.
    Silence gives consent--therefore any attempt, no matter how polite, to address the matter with the cadet or chief officer will likely be met with hostility (even if veiled) and probably retaliation, as well.

    Then again, I'm not a big believer in political correctness, especially in the firehouse... so my solution would be very blunt: Next time the kid tries to give you undeserved crap or throw weight around that he doesn't have, point at his collar and ask him where his bugles are. When he responds that he doesn't have any, say "Exactly," and leave him there to ponder the point you just made.

    That's the nice version, anyways.

    The situation recalls to me an old "military urban legend": some years ago at an unnamed Air Force base, the 1-star commanding the base began to hear rumors and complaints from the civilian and enlisted workers on-base that the base officers' wives were behaving very rudely and being snide to them.
    To settle the matter, the 1-star called all of the base officers' wives together in the base theatre for a meeting.
    As they all filed in, the 1-star came in and asked them to seat themselves according to rank. Immediately, a squabble broke out among who should sit in the front row, 2nd row, etc... "My husband's a Major," said one, "Well mine's a Colonel," scoffed another... as all this was going on, the General roared "SIT DOWN AND SHUT UP!"
    The chagrined women did as they were told, and the General addressed those who took seats in the back rows without argument, saying, "Those of you who quietly took seats in the back are in the right. Those who fought for the front rows, you are wrong. It is your husband that wears the rank, not you. Dismissed."
    And with that, he turned and walked away to a shocked-silent audience of AF spouses.

    The moral of the story: like the General said, your husband/dad/mother/brother/cousin/whoever wears the rank, not you.

    I suppose you could try telling that story to the Chief or his/her kid, but somehow, I think the point would be missed.


    thats a pretty awesome urban legend, i'll keep it in my mind
    but thanks so much for the advice.
    i really apprechiate it.

    Leave a comment:


  • the1141man
    replied
    Originally posted by summermist21FD View Post
    might i add in a politically correct way
    Ohhhh...a politically correct way...important thing to specify, there.

    Let's see...politically correct way....

    Oh, yeah: Quit. Find another department.

    That's about the only "politically correct" way to handle it.

    The reason I say this is because if the son/daughter was mature, they wouldn't be throwing their "weight" around. If the chief officer parent was mature and caught wind of their kid pulling crap, they'd step on them so hard they'd be defecating vital organs for a week.
    Beings as a good chief/line officer knows all that goes on in their Company/station, the parent probably has some idea of what their kid is doing.
    Silence gives consent--therefore any attempt, no matter how polite, to address the matter with the cadet or chief officer will likely be met with hostility (even if veiled) and probably retaliation, as well.

    Then again, I'm not a big believer in political correctness, especially in the firehouse... so my solution would be very blunt: Next time the kid tries to give you undeserved crap or throw weight around that he doesn't have, point at his collar and ask him where his bugles are. When he responds that he doesn't have any, say "Exactly," and leave him there to ponder the point you just made.

    That's the nice version, anyways.

    The situation recalls to me an old "military urban legend": some years ago at an unnamed Air Force base, the 1-star commanding the base began to hear rumors and complaints from the civilian and enlisted workers on-base that the base officers' wives were behaving very rudely and being snide to them.
    To settle the matter, the 1-star called all of the base officers' wives together in the base theatre for a meeting.
    As they all filed in, the 1-star came in and asked them to seat themselves according to rank. Immediately, a squabble broke out among who should sit in the front row, 2nd row, etc... "My husband's a Major," said one, "Well mine's a Colonel," scoffed another... as all this was going on, the General roared "SIT DOWN AND SHUT UP!"
    The chagrined women did as they were told, and the General addressed those who took seats in the back rows without argument, saying, "Those of you who quietly took seats in the back are in the right. Those who fought for the front rows, you are wrong. It is your husband that wears the rank, not you. Dismissed."
    And with that, he turned and walked away to a shocked-silent audience of AF spouses.

    The moral of the story: like the General said, your husband/dad/mother/brother/cousin/whoever wears the rank, not you.

    I suppose you could try telling that story to the Chief or his/her kid, but somehow, I think the point would be missed.

    Leave a comment:


  • summermist21FD
    replied
    Originally posted by jerry4184 View Post
    i basically looked at him, laughed, put my pack on, and went into the fire he couldn't. He hasn't said much to me after that. Our biggest problem hasnt been with jrs with senior members as parents walking over black hats, so much as walking over their parent, and getting special privelages. But it hasn't happened too much, and it's usually no big deal.
    oh yeah. true.
    well thanks for the reply &
    stay safe.

    Leave a comment:


  • jerry4184
    replied
    i basically looked at him, laughed, put my pack on, and went into the fire he couldn't. He hasn't said much to me after that. Our biggest problem hasnt been with jrs with senior members as parents walking over black hats, so much as walking over their parent, and getting special privelages. But it hasn't happened too much, and it's usually no big deal.

    Leave a comment:


  • summermist21FD
    replied
    Originally posted by RFRDxplorer View Post
    Ummm, not really. Those people tend to have more experience or knowledge out of the chute than the average beaver, but it is not always the case.
    thank you for your response.
    & stay safe

    Leave a comment:

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