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  • TAFDTruck5FF
    replied
    Our dept has them but you have to live within 30 mins from a station... I'll say half of dept lives outside the city limits and the other half live within the city... Overall it's better here to live within as where a Twin city with Texas and to keep it equal you don't have to pay State taxes on Payroll... I'm outside the city and state taxes hit me for avg. of 200.00 per month...

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  • fdronald
    replied
    Residency Requirements

    Our residency requirements over time became obsolete. When I first started in my department all members had to live within the local phone calling area. Eventually this requirement was eased somewhat. There was still a residency requirement but if you lived outside the local calling area then you had to sign an agreement that would accept long distance charges from the employer. This was before cell phones became the norm for every member. Now we do not have any residency requirements. The main county where my department is located is in the top three counties of the state as far as property taxes and vehicle/home insurance rates are concerned. So many firefighters choose to live in bordering counties to save money. I am not completely sure, but I think that the Chief of Department must still live within the city limits as well as all department heads of the municipality.

    Leave a comment:


  • bnartker
    replied
    D#mn $100,000 for a mobile home!...........Won't find many mullets there! I actually had a patient on the squad ask me one day if I was a "local boy" or an "outsider"......I said local...cause I was....and they said good, they didn't want any "out of towner" touching them. Crazy!

    Leave a comment:


  • FyredUp
    replied
    jasper....just step across the border and apply....



    Residency is nothing more than a way for the admin and the mayor to put their thumbs on the forehead of the firefighters OR other city workers and control them. Nothing more, nothing less.

    FyredUp

    Leave a comment:


  • jasper45
    replied
    The funny thing is, most people who support residency policies are those who don't live under one, and those that do don't have big-city, high-crime issues to deal with, like whether their kids will be safe in school, or whether their teacher will be sexually assaulted in front of them.

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  • NortheastFF
    replied
    In Boston, the residency requirement was a political tool for the Mayor to win more votes back in 1994. Times were tough; city government was (as it still is) incompetent, crime was out of control, etc. The Mayor felt that by requiring city workers to live within city limits he would get better quality residents.

    Members of the Union settled a contract by agreeing to residency for any additional hires. Of course single family homes in nice neighborhoods were only $150,000 at the time. Now they're $450,000. Also, we have some of the highest auto insurance rates in the country.

    Lastly, there are no guarantees as to where you children go to school. You can live in a nice neighborhood like West Roxbury, or St. Brendan's in Dorchester, only to have your children bused out to other neighborhoods, while others are bused in for diversity reasons. To top it off, students of African American and Hispanic descent are entitled to the Metco program and can be bused to some of the wealthier suburbs, to bring diversity into those neighborhoods as well. Note: I don't fault any parents for taking advantage of the Metco program, I just don't believe its fair or appropriate. Anyway, we're really stuck between a rock and a hard place here.

    Out of 1,500 members we now have at least 500 covered by residency, so we're gaining momentum. My guess is eventually we'll settle for smaller raises, or something to that extent in order to get out of it. It may take 5 or 10 years and might create some hostility but it will happen.

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  • ChicagoFF
    replied
    Originally posted by Dashman
    My opinon is that you want to work in a town,You should live in the town
    or very close to it,I have seen to many times the attitude of screw it,
    I dont live here from both cops and firefighters.
    Go ahead and bash me if you must but I feel that you must have some
    pride and respect for the people that are paying you,Not just being there to
    collect a paycheck.

    rant off sitting in the corner waiting for the beating.
    You are a goof. 1. They don't pay us enough to make living here, in a decent neighborhood, affordable 2. They are paying me to do a job, not have a cheery *** attitude. 3. The "people that are paying me" don't live anywhere near my still district. 4. I am there to collect a check - it's a job, remember?!? I'm stuck with residency and I knew the rules when I signed on so I'll continue paying several thousand dollars a month to live in a less than desireable neighborhood, but don't try to tell me to like it or that it's right. Jagoff.
    Last edited by ChicagoFF; 11-09-2006, 09:45 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • FyredUp
    replied
    Originally posted by Dashman
    My opinon is that you want to work in a town,You should live in the town
    or very close to it,I have seen to many times the attitude of screw it,
    I dont live here from both cops and firefighters.
    Go ahead and bash me if you must but I feel that you must have some
    pride and respect for the people that are paying you,Not just being there to
    collect a paycheck.

    rant off sitting in the corner waiting for the beating.
    I live roughly 5 counties away from the city I protect as a firefighter. Why? Because I can. Whose business is it where I live? Mine. My FD has NO residency and cares only about you being there when your shift begins.

    There is a huge fallacy in your attitude. You assume that I or anyone else must be a resident in order to care for the citizens we serve. Perhaps you need that motivation of them being your neighbors in order to find a reason to care. I do not. When I am on duty I give the citizens of the city I protect 100%. Being a resident of that city or not has no effect on my dedication to duty.

    Residency is an archaic rule that does nothing more than make you pay taxes back to the city to help pay your own wages.

    FyredUp

    Leave a comment:


  • DeputyMarshal
    replied
    In short, residency requirements suck.

    Where I am when I'm off-duty is none of the damn department's business as long as I show up for my assigned shift.

    (CT finally did away with residency requirements as a mandatory subject of bargaining. They can only be in the contract if both labor and management want them. If either party says, "No," they're out of the contract. Needless to say, nobody in labor has any reason to leave them in...)

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptainGonzo
    replied
    Originally posted by HuskerMedic
    Years ago, when I was job hunting, I was looking through a department's web site-unfortunately, I can't remember which department it was.

    This department took a different approach-they didn't require you to live in the city, but if you chose to live outside of the city, you had to pay an "in-lieu" of tax; if I remember correctly, I think it amounted to 3% of your salary.
    I would certainly hope that if you lived within the city limits, they would reduce your taxes or increase your salary by the same 3% they would charge someone living out of town.


    We have a residency requirement per se... 15 air miles (or as the eagle flies) from the City line. Existing single family homes sell in the $300K to $600K range, new construction starts in the mid $600K and up to $1.2 million. Condos range from the $150K for a garden style, to $400K for a townhouse. Even homes in the mobile home parks are in the $100K range for a nice one.

    In the last contract, the residency clause was more or less rescinded. It can be reinstated if the Fire Chief determines that responses to call backs is insuffucient, but it would only affect new hires as of the date of reinstatement. ANyone who moved out of the 15 air mile radius would not be required to move back into the city.

    My own opinion about residency...

    In my 25 years on "da job", when someone is having a serious medical emergency, been trapped in a car wreck or their home is on fire, I have yet to be asked if I live in the city, or been told that they wanted a "city resident" to treat them, cut them out of the wreck or put the fire out. If the people we serve don't care where we live, why should the politicians who make these stupid rules?

    Leave a comment:


  • HuskerMedic
    replied
    Years ago, when I was job hunting, I was looking through a department's web site-unfortunately, I can't remember which department it was.

    This department took a different approach-they didn't require you to live in the city, but if you chose to live outside of the city, you had to pay an "in-lieu" of tax; if I remember correctly, I think it amounted to 3% of your salary.

    One of my former employers had a "30 minute response" residency requirement-it was virtually ignored as it was unenforceable ("I can make it if I drive at the speed of sound").

    Leave a comment:


  • FTMPTB15
    replied
    Here is CMPD's residency requirement:
    Residency Requirements for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Officers

    The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department Rules of Conduct dictate that all sworn police officers will:

    * Reside in North Carolina
    * Within a 45 mile radius of Police Headquarters

    While they are employed with the CMPD, all sworn employees must continue to abide by this rule.

    Please use this link to help you determine if your residence is within the bounds the CMPD allows: 45 Mile Radius Map (pdf)

    Leave a comment:


  • Dashman
    replied
    Besides if there is a disaster in the area and I live in the area, or nearby, don't you think that there’s a chance my home or family might also be affected by this disaster?


    Or any where else? With that logic I hope you find a nice safe Batcave to live in.Not to be a smart *** but think about your above quote.

    Leave a comment:


  • stubie
    replied
    The state of California has a law in effect that states that a fire department or other public service agency can set a residency requirement within a "reasonable" boundary. It does not specify a distance or hour mark. This is up to the department to determine. The issue with us now is, "what's reasonable" and what's not. Our administration have agreed to grandfather in those who currently live out side of the county (which is the 2nd smallest county in California) and have proposed limiting residency to only the surrounding counties. So those who currently live in these area's or are new hires are now limited where they can live. The problem is that you have nothing to gain in any of the surrounding counties because their affordability is just as outrageous if not worse! Their reasoning, the administration, is that in the event of a disaster off duty personnel would have a delay in response to support any relief efforts. That's understandable but not consistent enough to me or the union to necessitate a residency requirement. Besides if there is a disaster in the area and I live in the area, or nearby, don't you think that there’s a chance my home or family might also be affected by this disaster?

    Leave a comment:


  • jlcooke3
    replied
    Originally posted by Dashman
    My opinon is that you want to work in a town,You should live in the town
    or very close to it,I have seen to many times the attitude of screw it,
    I dont live here from both cops and firefighters.
    Go ahead and bash me if you must but I feel that you must have some
    pride and respect for the people that are paying you,Not just being there to
    collect a paycheck.

    rant off sitting in the corner waiting for the beating.
    And on the other hand I have worked with those that live where they work with the attitude of screw it. Where you live doesn't instill pride in your job (or at least shouldn't). Residency requirements may work in some areas where housing and the salary are on par. They do not work when the cost of living and housing far exceed the salary being paid, or when the only other option is to live in some ghetto where you just as likely to be shot as said hello to. The one part of your post that we both agree with is that we all should have some pride and respect for the people that are paying us.

    Leave a comment:

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