Announcement

Collapse

Firehouse.com Forum Rules & Guidelines

Forum Rules & Guidelines

Not Permitted or Tolerated:
• Advertising and/or links of commercial, for-profit websites, products, and/or services is not permitted. If you have a need to advertise on Firehouse.com please contact sales@firehouse.com
• Fighting/arguing
• Cyber-bullying
• Swearing
• Name-calling and/or personal attacks
• Spamming
• Typing in all CAPS
• “l33t speak” - Substituting characters for letters in an effort to represent a word or phrase. (example: M*****ive)
• Distribution of another person’s personal information, regardless of whether or not said information is public knowledge and whether or not an individual has permission to post said personal information
• Piracy advocation of any kind
• Racist, sexual, hate type defamatory, religious, political, or sexual commentary.
• Multiple forum accounts

Forum Posting Guidelines:

Posts must be on-topic, non-disruptive and relevant to the firefighting community. Post only in a mature and responsible way that contributes to the discussion at hand. Posting relevant information, helpful suggestions and/or constructive criticism is a great way to contribute to the community.

Post in the correct forum and have clear titles for your threads.

Please post in English or provide a translation.

There are moderators and admins who handle these forums with care, do not resort to self-help, instead please utilize the reporting option. Be mature and responsible for yourself and your posts. If you are offended by another member utilize the reporting option. All reported posts will be addressed and dealt with as deemed appropriate by Firehouse.com staff.

Firehouse.com Moderation Process:
Effective immediately, the following moderation process will take effect. User(s) whose posts are determined by Firehouse.com staff to be in violation of any of the rules above will EARN the following reprimand(s) in the moderation process:
1. An initial warning will be issued.
2. A Final Warning will be issued if a user is found to be in violation a second time.
3. A 3-day suspension will be issued if the user continues to break the forum rules.
4. A 45-day suspension will be issued if the user is found to be a habitual rule breaker.
5. Habitual rule breakers that have exhausted all of the above will receive a permanent life-time ban that will be strictly enforced. Reinstatement will not be allowed – there is no appeal process.

Subsequent accounts created in an effort to side-step the rules and moderation process are subject to automatic removal without notice. Firehouse.com reserves the right to expedite the reprimand process for any users as it is deemed necessary. Any user in the moderation process may be required to review and agree to by email the terms and conditions listed above before their account is re-instated (except for those that are banned).

Firehouse.com reserves the right to edit and/or remove any post or member, at any time, for any reason without notice. Firehouse.com also reserves the right to warn, suspend, and/or ban, any member, at any time, for any reason.

Firehouse.com values the active participation we have in our forums. Please ensure your posts are tasteful and tactful. Thank you very much for your cooperation.
See more
See less

Promoted to Lieutenant, assistance needed

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Promoted to Lieutenant, assistance needed

    So this past month our Lieutenant passed his position down to me after discussion with our Chief and Dep. Chief. Quick rundown, we are a small volunteer dept consisting of approx 15 members, 8 or which are probies, including myself. We handle maybe 20 calls per year, most of which are wildland and false calls, with the odd major structure, vehicle fire, etc.
    I was reading about Lieutenant's Syndrome and am currently doing my best to avoid this condition.
    Anyways, i have yet to sit down with our Chief and Deputy Chief to discuss their wishes for my new position, but i'd like to get input on what a small department Lieutenants are responsible for? I've looked into what career Lieutenants cover and we just haven't got their yet in regards to equipment, training and duties.
    With our dept slowly getting everyone trained in Fire behavior, PPE, SCBAs, Equipment etc, whats my best options for getting my Lieutenant ABC's down? Should I contact another similar dept and have a mentor to help guide me in learning? I will be honest, the guidance is not prevalent in our dept, and most probies only get a few hours a month at the monthly meeting to learn and hone skills. I've been reading and attempting to do hands on work from my Essentials Handbook, and this month i'll be going over the Officers handbook. Basically, just looking for advice, guidance and overall understanding of what could be entailed for my position.
    Thanks

  • #2
    First question is what does your organizational tree look like?

    I would opine that if you're still a probie, you're simply filling a slot in that tree.

    If you're the only LT, I would suggest that makes you something like fourth or fifth in command, behind the chiefs and maybe a captain. You therefore face the possibility of being in command of an incident, or being assigned some aspect of command at an incident.

    If you haven't already, be sure to get ICS 100, 200, 700 and 800 under your belt. They're on-line (at FEMA) and free. In fact, they should be required for everyone.

    As for your department's expectations - that's very hard for us to assess - in a small department such as yours the responsibilities could include any of a wide range of things. You need to talk to your superiors (including senior members) to find out what they are. Find out who's held the job in the past and talk to them.

    With 20 calls a year (we finished with 138) the impetus to train is small - you don't get many reminders in the form of real calls. Regardless of what you do in-house, if you have opportunities to attend training outside your department, take advantage of them, and take someone else along.





    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the FEMA suggestion, I'll definitely get those done. I have a sit down planned with the Chief and Deputy Chief to discuss what they want to entail from me. Main reason was due to the previous LT Stepping down, and due to the minimal schooling training i have they felt id be next to take on that roll. It does seem like im the only one around the firehouse willing to donate his time into cleaning, maintenance of gear, inspections, physical training, etc other than the Chief.
      Ive taken some outside dept training through the provinces volunteer association which was highly beneficial and hopefully more to come. We're planning on bringing in an instructor a few times this year to get guys taught as well but for the most part, only training is during our monthly meeting which by that standard, will take years to have our guys be up to par on everything.

      Comment


      • #4
        20 calls a year makes it hard to gain experience. if 50% of your department are probies, that's scary. If your a proby and acting as a lieutenant, that's even scarier. You don't know the job of a firefighter, yet they want you to be in charge of firefighters? and direct their actions? huge warning sign, esp if something happens and you get blamed.

        Speak to the chiefs and captains about what they expect. Every department is different.

        as for training, do what you can to complete your firefighter 1 and 2 certification. even if it's outside of your primary area. Learn the basics of firefighting... once you are comfortable with that, look at officer stuff.

        You can always push to change training from once a month to once a week. That's what we do.
        If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

        FF/EMT/DBP

        Comment


        • #5
          drparasite - I fully agree, i am currently taking every course available when it comes up in my area, as well as studying at home from Essentials 6, ICS, and training sessions from the volunteer association and gov't training programs. Chief and Deputy don't expect me as of yet to command, but i've taken my ICS 100, in the instance they don't arrive on scene but that hasn't happened yet plus my Level 1 Basic/Behavior/PPE course, next is actual SCBA class, then on to knots and ladders, Wildland Suppresion, pump operations and the others to complete 1/2. Our dept is doing a lot of catch up and the initiative i show i show demonstrates the ability to lead. Once my Level 1 is complete, that will be the time i'll be given more responsibility in command if need be.
          We're actually around 75% probies. Hence why i'm on here looking for more insight to better myself. And as far as being blamed, yes your right, accountability is key when in command but the dept has 2 captains, a deputy Chief and Chief so the chances of myself having to be delegated FF's on scene are extremely low, and they still command myself as a FF while on scene. I don't plan to take any actual officer command outside the firehouse until training is complete, inside however i do pass along everything i know so far to those who dont. I practice at home for a couple hours a day with knots and ropes, physical training, learing fire behavior, going over my basics of what i do know, as well as speaking with a mentor/captain from another dept about things. What i want to know more about is what kind of responsibilities and actions small dept Lieutenants take care of on a daily basis in their house. Mine so far is cleaning, maintaining small equipment, helping other probie's learn their gear, fire behavior etc at meetings, I know there's still very minimal i can teach so what i do learn i make sure to pass that off and how to source that information online or manual.
          Im pushing for bi-monthly meetings at this point but we are in the midst of the possible creation of a Fire Board so there's not a lot i can do politically until that's complete.
          The Chief is helping guide me by taking stuff off his plate to take care of so thats the start.
          Any guidance from others is highly accepted and recommended from others who do come across this thread.
          Humility is my key component in training.

          Comment


          • #6
            At the first volunteer department I was on, we had two chiefs, a captain, a 1st Lt and a second Lt. They all had separate administrative responsibilities. We had three stations: Station 1 had an engine, ladder, reserve engine, and snorkel. Station 2 had an engine, and heavy rescue. Station 3 had an engine, and occasionally the reserve engine or snorkel was relocated there.

            the 2nd Lt's ran the fire stations. It was their house, they were in charge of the engine, and responsible for the crew. The 1st Lt was in charge of all equipment, gear, and repairs. the captain was overall in charge of all the trucks. Chief's did what chief's do.

            If you were a second Lt on my department, you would be in charge of an apparatus. The chief's might be the IC, but the crew is your responsibility. He assigns your crew a task, and you tell your crew how you want it done. We NEVER had chief's on the apparatus. Captains and 1st Lts might show up, and could ride as officer, but it was typically the Lt's truck.

            Do what you can, train where and when you can. learn what you can. Take ICS 200 (the classroom is more useful than online). Complete your firefighter training. It might save your life, or the life of your crew one day.
            If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

            FF/EMT/DBP

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by drparasite View Post
              At the first volunteer department I was on, we had two chiefs, a captain, a 1st Lt and a second Lt. They all had separate administrative responsibilities. We had three stations: Station 1 had an engine, ladder, reserve engine, and snorkel. Station 2 had an engine, and heavy rescue. Station 3 had an engine, and occasionally the reserve engine or snorkel was relocated there.

              the 2nd Lt's ran the fire stations. It was their house, they were in charge of the engine, and responsible for the crew. The 1st Lt was in charge of all equipment, gear, and repairs. the captain was overall in charge of all the trucks. Chief's did what chief's do.

              If you were a second Lt on my department, you would be in charge of an apparatus. The chief's might be the IC, but the crew is your responsibility. He assigns your crew a task, and you tell your crew how you want it done. We NEVER had chief's on the apparatus. Captains and 1st Lts might show up, and could ride as officer, but it was typically the Lt's truck.

              Do what you can, train where and when you can. learn what you can. Take ICS 200 (the classroom is more useful than online). Complete your firefighter training. It might save your life, or the life of your crew one day.
              Its crazy to see how vastly different volly departments are organized. Its normal for our chief or deputy chief to be on the nozzle or manning the pump. One or the other takes IC ant the other usually takes nozzle or backup. We are small and usually the only two people not doing work are the IC and safety officer. Everyone else, including chief, is actively working.

              Comment

              300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

              Collapse

              300x600 Forums Only

              Collapse

              Taboola

              Collapse

              Upper 300x250

              Collapse

              Lower 970x90

              Collapse

              Lower 728x90

              Collapse

              Lower 300x50

              Collapse
              Working...
              X